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How to Approach the LSAT Logic Games

Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the logic games section of the LSAT.  On the program we have Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation, and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses; Jeff Thomas, Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Andrew Brody, National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review.

The logic games section of the LSAT is often seen as the most foreign and daunting part of the test, and with good reason: No other standardized test has questions even closely resembling LSAT logic games. Our experts discuss how to prepare for the section, common logic games misconceptions, and how to become an expert on the topic.

Our first guest, Dave Killoran (CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation, and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses), says the logic games section is different than anything students will see on another standardized test or even in law school.  He talks about how you can increase your logic games section success by taking the time to determine which problem-solving approaches work best for you. He also offers advice on how classes, tutors, and books can help students achieve logic games victories.

Our next guest, Jeff Thomas (Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions), says the logic games section requires no specific knowledge base; he says it is a skill that takes time to learn and master.  Along with Killoran, Thomas states that practice is the best way to excel in the logic games section.

Our final guest, Andrew Brody (National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review), says that, even though students may see this section as the hardest, he often sees the most improvement on this section if students dedicate themselves to logic games study and practice.  Brody also offers two pieces of advice that can make students the best “logic gamer” possible: Get the answer on the paper, not just in your head; don’t rush into the question, and take the time to diagram the set-up.

Guests:

Dave Killoran – CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses
Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Andrew Brody – National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review

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