Law School Interactive https://lawschoolinteractive.com Law School Podcasts is a website that educates potential and current law school students. On a weekly basis we post podcasts that will answer law school frequently asked questions, profile an individual law school, or discuss the LSAT, law school, or the field of law. Tue, 21 Oct 2014 04:16:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Copyright 2010 Law School Interactive bev@lawschoolinteractive.com (Law School Interactive) bev@lawschoolinteractive.com (Law School Interactive) Law School 1440 https://lawschoolinteractive.com/images/iTunes.png Law School Interactive http://lawschoolinteractive.com 144 144 http://feeds.feedburner.com/LawSchoolInteractive Law School Interactive is a website that will educate potential and current law school students. On a weekly basis we post podcasts that answer law school frequently asked questions, profile an individual law school, or dive into an interesting top[...] Law School Interactive is a website that educates potential and current law school students. On a weekly basis we post podcasts that profile an individual law school, provide strategy for LSAT prep, or dive into an interesting topic related to preparing for law school or practicing law. law, school, lsat, prep, law, school, podcast, law, school, student, life, law Law School Interactive Law School Interactive bev@lawschoolinteractive.com no no Preparing for Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/preparing-for-law-school/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/preparing-for-law-school/#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:29:18 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=446 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast we take a look at preparing for law school. Many students wonder if they should do anything to ensure they are successful in law school, but don’t know where to start or what to do. Our experts talk about a variety of steps incoming law students can take to make sure they are prepared as they embark on their first year of law school.

Ursula Furi-Perry, Adjunct Professor at UMass Law and co-creator of PowerScore’s Law School Advantage course, talks about the importance of academic preparation, and discusses not only the new material but also the new ways of thinking law school will require you to learn. She also stresses that being personally ready to enter law school is important, and mentions the importance of being mentally ready for the workload and demands of a law school career.

Don Macaulay, President and Founder of Law Preview, tells us about the importance of doing well your first year of law school-not just because of your grades, but also because your first year performance is often tied into considering for Law Review and summer associate positions.

Our third guest is Gary Young, attorney and author of Law School Ninja. His book talks about “outsmarting” law school, and discusses the practical knowledge you will need to succeed as you go on this academic endeavor. He draws upon his personal law school experience and discusses the enormous amounts of reading and outlining required in law school (which can often take many hours of sitting and concentrating) and can prove to be difficult if you haven’t concentrated on that type of studying before. One of the most important steps you can take, he says, is making sure you understand the study skills and study habits required for law school.

Guests:

Ursula Furi-Perry – Director of Academic Support and Adjunct Professor at The Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
Don Macaulay – President and Founder – Law Preview
Gary Young – Attorney and Author of Law School Ninja

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/preparing-for-law-school/feed/ 0 0:12:56 In this week’s podcast we take a look at preparing for law school. Many students wonder if they should do anything to ensure they are successful in law school, but don’t know where to start or what to do. Our experts talk about a variety of steps in[...] In this week’s podcast we take a look at preparing for law school. Many students wonder if they should do anything to ensure they are successful in law school, but don’t know where to start or what to do. Our experts talk about a variety of steps incoming law students can take to make sure they are prepared as they embark on their first year of law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
Getting to Know the LSAT https://lawschoolinteractive.com/getting-to-know-the-lsat/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/getting-to-know-the-lsat/#comments Sun, 12 Oct 2014 08:54:41 +0000 http://lawschoolpodcasts.com/?p=162 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast covers the basics of the LSAT. We spoke with Linda Ashar, author of 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT; Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore; and Andrew Brody, Princeton Review’s National Content Director for LSAT Programs. In the program we take a look at some particulars of the test, including: when the exam is offered; the section break-down and timing of each section; and the content of the six sections (analytical reasoning, logical reasoning, reading comprehensive and an experimental section).

Listen to what the experts have to say about: the strategy of taking the test; not letting the experimental section hurt your performance on other sections; the misconceptions of the test (for example, it doesn’t test subject based knowledge); and the best ways to prepare for the LSAT.

This podcast will provide you with a working knowledge of the LSAT, helping you understand the basics of the test and giving you an idea of the best way to prepare for this important exam.

Guests:

Linda Ashar - Author - 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT
Jon Denning - Development Director - PowerScore
Andrew Brody - National Content Director for LSAT Programs - Princeton Review

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/getting-to-know-the-lsat/feed/ 0 0:07:22 This week’s podcast covers the basics of the LSAT. We spoke with Linda Ashar, author of 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT; Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore; and Andrew Brody, Princeton Review’s National Content Director for LSAT [...] This week’s podcast covers the basics of the LSAT. We spoke with Linda Ashar, author of 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT; Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore; and Andrew Brody, Princeton Review’s National Content Director for LSAT Programs. In the program we take a look at some particulars of the test, including: when the exam is offered; the section break-down and timing of each section; and the content of the six sections (analytical reasoning, logical reasoning, reading comprehensive and an experimental section). More... Law School Interactive no no
Law School – Beyond the Classroom https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom/#comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 08:21:12 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=464 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast explores student life in law school. We discuss the need for and benefits of involvement in student organizations while attending law school.

Deans Laura Ferrari and Janet Stearns both emphasize that being involved in life outside of the classroom during law school is important. They discuss how participating in different organizations can offer many networking opportunities for students, as well as being the conduit to involvement in aspects of the law in which you may not be able to take a class. Student organizations, they state, allow you to add variety and spice to the set curriculum of your 1L year.

However, Dean Ferrari and Dean Stearns also believe that working hard to maintain a good balance between academic requirement and extracurricular involvement is important. Students, they say, should make sure they are not overwhelmed with their student organization commitments, and can still on their academics.

Our student guest is Kent Lloyd, a member of the Penn State Law Class of 2010 and the Vice Chair on the American Bar Association Student Law Division. He echoes the advice of Deans Ferrari and Stearns, but also offers advice to students interested in becoming involved in law school student organizations, emphasizing the importance of not just signing up for organizations, but also reaching out to the current student leaders of each group and inquiring what would be required of 1L and 2L students who want to become involved. Student life, he suggests, can be a valuable addition to your law school career, when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations.

Guests:

Laura Ferrari – Dean of Students – Suffolk University Law School
Janet Stearns – Dean of Students – University of Miami Law School
Kent Lloyd – Vice Chair of the American Bar Association Student Law Division and Third-Year Law Student at Penn State’s Dickinson School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom/feed/ 0 0:10:44 This week’s podcast explores student life in law school. We discuss the need for and benefits of involvement in student organizations while attending law school. More... This week’s podcast explores student life in law school. We discuss the need for and benefits of involvement in student organizations while attending law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
Overcoming Test Anxiety https://lawschoolinteractive.com/overcoming-test-anxiety/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/overcoming-test-anxiety/#comments Mon, 22 Sep 2014 08:24:30 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=436 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s bonus podcast will take an in-depth look at test anxiety. We will hear from two experts on test anxiety: Dr. Joseph Casbarro, author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It, and Benjamin Moss, a clinical hypnotherapist in California.

Benjamin Moss starts by discussing what he believes to be the root of test anxiety: The test-taker’s overwhelming concern of the outcome. He explains that students are often so concerned with what will happen once the outcome of the test is revealed that they become overwhelmed with the test itself. Like Dr. Joseph Casbarro does later in the program, he discusses the use of breathing exercises to calm the nerves, reduce the stress, and aid in the focus of anxious test-takers. He says he believes that students will soon turn to hypnotherapy in order to defray the stress associated with the LSAT, and perhaps even the Bar.

Dr. Casbarro starts by emphasizing the importance of test preparation. He states that, even if you have breathing exercises and anxiety remedies on hand, you will not perform to the best of your ability if you are not prepared for the exam. He remains positive about anxious students’ abilities to channel their stress and anxiety into fruitful test results, however, and says that, although this stress and anxiety comes from years of habits built during test taking and can’t be changed overnight, it is possible to change and positively affect these behavior and harness test anxiety to a student’s benefit.

Guests:

Dr. Joseph Casbarro – Author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It
Benjamin MossClinical Hypnotherapist

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/overcoming-test-anxiety/feed/ 0 0:14:17 This week’s bonus podcast will take an in-depth look at test anxiety. We will hear from two experts on test anxiety: Dr. Joseph Casbarro, author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It, and Benjamin Moss, a clinical hypnotherapist in California[...] This week’s bonus podcast will take an in-depth look at test anxiety. We will hear from two experts on test anxiety: Dr. Joseph Casbarro, author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It, and Benjamin Moss, a clinical hypnotherapist in California. More... Law School Interactive no no
Day in the Life of a Law Student https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:15:24 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=378 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast places us in a unique vantage point as we hear first-hand stories from three different students currently in law school. We will talk with a married law student who took time off before attending law school, a transfer student, and even someone who finished their undergraduate degree in three years, and then went immediately on to law school.

This podcast gives us a look inside students’ lives as they embark on their journey through law school, and gives us a perspective of what other students can expect if they decide to reach for the same goal.

John Carroll talks about the process of being a transfer student and what it was like to attend first a small private school, and then a large public institution. Kevin Mills tell us what it was like to take time off before attending law school, and how he balances school with being a husband. From Kim Watson we hear her story of finishing undergrad in three years and now being on the fast-track to a law degree.

Guests:

Kevin Mills – Second Year – Stanford Law School
Kim Watson – First Year – University of Illinois College of Law
John Carroll – Second Year – Transferred to the University of South Carolina

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student/feed/ 2 0:22:15 This week’s podcast places us in a unique vantage point as we hear first-hand stories from three different students currently in law school. We will talk with a married law student who took time off before attending law school, a transfer student, [...] This week’s podcast places us in a unique vantage point as we hear first-hand stories from three different students currently in law school. We will talk with a married law student who took time off before attending law school, a transfer student, and even someone who finished their undergraduate degree in three years, and then went immediately on to law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
What can I do with a JD? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-jd/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-jd/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:01:09 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=345 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What to do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indiana School of Law; and Robert Nelson, Director of the American Bar Foundation.

Robert Boland came to us with a rather unique story. Although he was a passionate student athlete in college, worked in various athletics-related capacities, and did graduate work in sports broadcast management, he didn’t immediately go into sports agency after law school. Instead, he clerked, then served as an assistant district attorney, confidential assistant to a trial judge, and as a special counsel in antitrust litigation (the most common sports law issue) at two large New York law firms. It was only when he co-founded Global Athletic Management Enterprises (GAME) in 1998 that he began to build his sports clientele, and truly began a fruitful career in sports agency: endorsement and general athletic contract negotiation. He still works in the sports industry and serves as a full-time professor at NYU in the Masters of Sports Management program.

Our other two guests also shed light to other options available to students who graduate with a law degree.
Caroline Dowd Higgins talks about the advice she gives her students when they are just starting law school and are looking for a career path.

Robert Nelson talks about a study the American Bar Foundation did called After the JD and some of the surprising (and not-so-surprising) facts they discovered.

One of the most poignant (and most heartening) things you will learn from this podcast is that with a law degree you can-and many people do-follow your heart and do almost anything.

Guests:

Robert Boland – Professor, Sports Agent, Attorney – New York University
Caroline Dowd Higgins – Director of the Career and Professional Development Office – Indiana University
Robert Nelson – Director – American Bar Foundation

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-jd/feed/ 6 0:13:52 In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What to do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indian[...] In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What to do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indiana School of Law; and Robert Nelson, Director of the American Bar Foundation. More... Law School Interactive no no
Paying for Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/paying-for-law-school/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/paying-for-law-school/#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 07:36:57 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=279 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick (Director of Student Finance for the University of Connecticut Law School). Our experts comment on a variety of topics and ideas for students to consider when figuring out how to pay for law school.

Kim Clark says there are three things to consider when deciding about law school in general: Do you want to spend three years at law school? How are you going to pay for it? And, most importantly, what is going to happen once you graduate?

Joe Russo emphasizes the importance of remaining realistic with your chances of being admitted into law school and then paying off the loans you accrue when paying for it. His best piece of advice resonates of an old adage: If you don’t have to borrow, don’t borrow. He stresses that if you “live like a lawyer” (i.e., expensive housing, lavish meals, unnecessary expenditures) when you are a law student, you will live like a law student when you are a lawyer. He states that if students must borrow in order to live while in law school, they should do so sparingly and never over-borrow.

Finally, Roberta Frick goes over a variety of repayment plans that will benefit borrowers when they leave law school. She goes over loan forgiveness options and also discusses income based repayment plans (LRAPs) that allow borrowers to significantly reduce their monthly loan payments and have them be based on their income instead of their loan balance due.

Guests:

Kim Clark – Lead Education Writer – US News and World Report (Best Law Schools)
Joe Russo – Director of Student Financial Strategies – University of Notre Dame
Roberta Frick – Director of Student Finance – University of Connecticut Law School

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/paying-for-law-school/feed/ 1 0:15:26 This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick ([...] This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick (Director of Student Finance for the University of Connecticut Law School). Our experts comment on a variety of topics and ideas for students to consider when figuring out how to pay for law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
Is law school right for me? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-me/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-me/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:49:07 +0000 http://lawschoolpodcasts.com/?p=140 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast helps answer the question “Is Law School Right For Me?”. We spoke to Jose Ivan Roman, Assistant Director of Admissions at Boston Law School; Kelly Shull Cannon, Partner at Houser, Newman, Besley Law Firm; and Kris Tina Carlston, Lawyer and Pre-Law Advisor at Brigham Young University. Our experts discussed the qualities and skill sets it takes to succeed in the law school classroom and the questions to ask yourself before entering into the financial and time commitments of law school. Though Jose Ivan Roman doesn’t believe a specific personality is made for law school, all three of our experts believe there are specific skill-sets needed to succeed. They mentioned drive and determination, along with analytical, writing, reading, and public speaking skills as being necessary for a successful law school student.

Along with what they believe you need to succeed, all three of these professionals mentioned that there are many considerations to be addressed before making your decision. Roman comments on the intellectual toughness of the program, Carlston mentions that a law degree doesn’t guarantee large salaries but could come with large debt, and Cannon speaks on the agility you must have to be a successful candidate.

If you still aren’t sure law school is the best option for you – listen to this podcast and hear opinions from three professionals who have either been to law school, work for a law school, or both!

Guests:

Jose Ivan Roman - Assistant Director of Admissions - Boston College Law
Kelly Shull Cannon - Partner - Howser, Newman, Besley Law Firm
Kris Tina Carlston - Attorney and Pre-Law Advisor - Brigham Young University

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-me/feed/ 2 0:08:14 This week’s podcast helps answer the question “Is Law School Right For Me?”. We spoke to Jose Ivan Roman, Assistant Director of Admissions at Boston Law School; Kelly Shull Cannon, Partner at Houser, Newman, Besley Law Firm; and Kris Tina Carlston, [...] This week’s podcast helps answer the question “Is Law School Right For Me?”. We spoke to Jose Ivan Roman, Assistant Director of Admissions at Boston Law School; Kelly Shull Cannon, Partner at Houser, Newman, Besley Law Firm; and Kris Tina Carlston, Lawyer and Pre-Law Advisor at Brigham Young University. Our experts discussed the qualities and skill sets it takes to succeed in the law school classroom and the questions to ask yourself before entering into the financial and time commitments of law school. Though Jose Ivan Roman doesn’t believe a specific personality is made for law school, all three of our experts believe there are specific skill-sets needed to succeed. They mentioned drive and determination, along with analytical, writing, reading, and public speaking skills as being necessary for a successful law school student. More... Law School Interactive no no
How to Effectively Manage Your Time During the LSAT https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-effectively-manage-your-time-during-the-lsat-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-effectively-manage-your-time-during-the-lsat-3/#comments Mon, 04 Aug 2014 01:00:53 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1983 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses timing on the LSAT. Our guests discuss the “art and science” of LSAT pacing, the pitfalls of a timed standardized test, and advice on what students can do to improve their timing on the LSAT.

On the program we have Eva Lana, President of Binary Solution Test Preparation; Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review; and Sandy Hayes, Manager of The Steven Klein Test Prep Company.

Our first guest, Eva Lana, believes that students often “get stuck” on questions they don’t know, and lose time on the test that way. She advises all of her students to initially focus on the questions they can answer and skip the others. Lana believes that every student is a different type of test taker, and suggests that students focus on finding out which type of test taker they are, since that will allow them to be more successful. She encourages students to study and approach the LSAT with confidence, because this confidence will allow them to feel less pressured when taking the test.

Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review, says that pacing and accuracy are the best two traits students can have when trying to succeed on the LSAT. He talks about what students should do when, on the LSAT, they faced between skipping a question they don’t quite understand or working at it until they have an answer, although his may cost them valuable time. When it comes to understand and succeeding on LSAT timing, he says, practice makes perfect.

Our final guest, Sandy Hayes, says her students learn the best way to deal with timing on the LSAT through their test prep classes. She talks about her experiences with some of Klein’s past students as they worked through issues with timing, and says it is key for students to find a balance between being effective and being efficient on the test.

Guests:

Eva Lana – President of Binary Solution Test Preparation
Andrew Brody – National Content Director for LSAT Programs at the Princeton Review
Sandy Hayes – Manager of The Steven Klein Test Prep Company

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-effectively-manage-your-time-during-the-lsat-3/feed/ 0 0:10:06 This week's podcast discusses timing on the LSAT. Our guests discuss the "art and science" of LSAT pacing, the pitfalls of a timed standardized test, and advice on what students can do to improve their timing on the LSAT. More... This week's podcast discusses timing on the LSAT. Our guests discuss the "art and science" of LSAT pacing, the pitfalls of a timed standardized test, and advice on what students can do to improve their timing on the LSAT. More... Law School Interactive no no
The Under-Represented Minority https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-under-represented-minority-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-under-represented-minority-2/#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:27:57 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2107 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses law students that fall under the category of the underrepresented minority, or URM. LSAC states that only 1 out of every 25 lawyers is African American, Latino, Asian American or Native American. LSAC also states, as per the statistics available on their site, that only 25% of law school students were recognized minorities.

On today’s program we have Rizza Palmares, graduate of Mercer University School of Law and Student Bar Association (SBA) president; Chloe Reid, Dean of Admissions at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law; John Miller, Associate Director of Admissions at Vermont Law School; and Ruthe Ashley, Chair of the American Bar Association’s Council on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Educational Pipeline.

John Miller discusses how minorities are not just limited to ethnicity-they can also encompass age, race, and even sexual preference. Miller discusses the admissions criteria used to admit students to Vermont Law School, and talks about how LSAT scores and minority status work together on an application to his institution.

Chloe Reid, Dean of Admission at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law agrees with Director Miller, saying that the definition of what constitutes a “minority” is always evolving. It is not simply about ethnicity, or even race, age, or sexual preference. A student’s activities and accomplishments can also put them in a “minority” status.

Rizza Palmares gives us the student perspective on being a minority student. She believes students should use their status to enhance their application. She also says that being a minority in law school could also be an advantage, and goes on to describe her experience at Mercer as well as her involvement in many student organizations that encourage minorities to succeed and develop relationships with other students in their program.

Our last guest, Ruthe Ashley, is the Chair of the American Bar Association’s Council on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Educational Pipeline. She discusses her experience with underrepresented minorities in law school, and speaks about the disadvantages these students might have during the law school application process and why it is important to have minority representation in the legal field.

Guests:

Rizza Palmares – 2010 graduate of Mercer Law School, 2009 Student Bar Association President
Chloe Reid – Dean of Admissions, University of Southern California Gould School of Law
John Miller – Associate Director of Admissions, Vermont Law School
Ruthe Ashley – Chair of the American Bar Association, Council for Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Educational Pipeline

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-under-represented-minority-2/feed/ 0 0:13:33 This week’s podcast discusses law students that fall under the category of the underrepresented minority, or URM. LSAC states that only 1 out of every 25 lawyers is African American, Latino, Asian American or Native American. LSAC also states, as pe[...] This week’s podcast discusses law students that fall under the category of the underrepresented minority, or URM. LSAC states that only 1 out of every 25 lawyers is African American, Latino, Asian American or Native American. LSAC also states, as per the statistics available on their site, that in the only 25% of law school students were recognized minorities. More... Law School Interactive no no
The Law School Application Cycle https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-law-school-application-cycle/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-law-school-application-cycle/#comments Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:13:52 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2101 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the law school application cycle. Depending when you start the process, the task of applying to law school can take anywhere from six months to two years, and can involve everything from potential law school and legal profession research to the admissions decision waiting game.

One the program we have Heike Spahn, former Assistant Dean at the University of Chicago Law School and current senior consultant with Admission Consultants; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Kara Blanchard, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Drake University Law School.

Our first guest, Heike Spahn, says that your first step in the law school application cycle should be researching. She suggests that students do research of the legal profession prior to applying in order to truly know why they want to go to law school. Spahn also says that, when creating your application timeline, one of your initial concerns should be the LSAT. Since the LSAT is only offered four times a year, you should arrange the rest of your application process around your LSAT preparation and test date. Finally, she encourages students to create the schedule that works best for them; each student is different and she has seen a variety of effective timelines used to successfully apply to law school.

Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game, offers advice to students based on their LSAT test date and their current academic year in college. She warns that your law school application timeline will be much more condensed if you apply to law school during your senior year in college, whereas a college junior has a little bit more time to think about their options. She also says understanding “lead-time” is extremely important. She defines “lead-time” as the time it takes to prepare the supporting documents (personal statement, addenda, letter f recommendation, résumé) for a law school application, and says it could take anywhere from a week to a various months to solidify them, so make sure to give yourself as much time as you can. In addition, she says, once you have received all of your admissions decisions you should definitely adhere to the deadline for your seat deposit.

Our last guest, Kara Blanchard, agrees with Heike Spahn by stating that researching law schools and your reasons for becoming a lawyer are both very important. She also says that deciding when to take the LSAT is crucial. Blanchard also takes the time to break down an application cycle in the simplest way possible: September 1 – Application season begins. November 1 – Law schools start making admission decisions. March 1 – FASFA is due. April 1 – First seat deposit deadline.

Guests:

Heike Spahn – Senior Consultant with Admission Consultants and Former Assistant Dean at the University of Chicago Law School

Ann Levine – Author of The Law School Admission Game

Kara Blanchard – Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Drake University Law School

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-law-school-application-cycle/feed/ 0 0:13:25 This week’s podcast discusses the law school application cycle. Depending when you start the process, the task of applying to law school can take anywhere from six months to two years, and can involve everything from potential law school and legal p[...] This week’s podcast discusses the law school application cycle. Depending when you start the process, the task of applying to law school can take anywhere from six months to two years, and can involve everything from potential law school and legal profession research to the admissions decision waiting game. More... Law School Interactive no no
The Cost of Applying to Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-cost-of-applying-to-law-school-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-cost-of-applying-to-law-school-2/#comments Wed, 09 Jul 2014 13:24:07 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2096 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s program sheds light on the cost of applying to law school. While most students think only of LSAT and application fees when they consider the expenses involved with the law school application process, there are various other costs involved. In addition to LSAT and application fees, students will also incur Law School Credential Assembly (CAS) fees, the cost to travel and visit different law school programs, and the non-monetary (but still considerable) emotional cost of preparing for three years in a rigorous educational program.

On today’s podcast we will hear from Linda Abraham, President and CEO of Accepted.com; Randall Ryder, an attorney and contributor to Lawyerist.com; and David Pallozzi, Assistant Dean of Admissions at the University of Maine School of Law.

Everyone on the program discusses the high cost of applying to law school, and each suggests ways to help make that cost more manageable. Linda suggests that, if you decide to get additional outside help completing your applications, you only get assistance for the parts of you file that need it the most (i.e., your personal statement or addendums), and not spend money on sections you have fine-tune yourself. David suggests looking into application and LSAT fee waivers that can help defray the general fees associated with the process, and Randall advises cutting down on travel expenses by narrowing your list of potential law schools before visiting them.

Do you know what some of the most common law school and LSAT fees are? If you choose to apply to law school, make sure to consider the whole financial picture:

LSAT and LSAT Prep
LSAT prep can vary from $50 for a book to over $1,500 for a course.

Test registration: $160
Late registration: $160 + $69 (late fee)
Test date change: $80
Test center change: $35

Visit the LSAC and CAS Fee Services pages on LSAC.org for a complete list of potential LSAT costs and information on how to obtain an LSAT fee waiver.

Law School Applications and Admissions Counseling
Private admissions counseling can range from $100 to $1500.

Application fee: Ranges from $40 to $100 per school
LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS): $155 (base fee for CAS) + $12 per school you apply

Guests:

Linda Abraham – President/CEO of Accepted.com
Randall Ryder – Attorney and Contributor to Lawyerist.com
David Pallozzi – Assistant Dean for Admission at the University of Maine School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-cost-of-applying-to-law-school-2/feed/ 0 0:13:15 This week’s program sheds light on the cost of applying to law school. While most students think only of LSAT and application fees when they consider the expenses involved with the law school application process, there are various other costs involv[...] This week’s program sheds light on the cost of applying to law school. While most students think only of LSAT and application fees when they consider the expenses involved with the law school application process, there are various other costs involved. In addition to LSAT and application fees, students will also incur Law School Credential Assembly (CAS) fees, the cost to travel and visit different law school programs, and the non-monetary (but still considerable) emotional cost of preparing for three years in a rigorous educational program. More... Law School Interactive no no
Student Law Journals https://lawschoolinteractive.com/student-law-journals-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/student-law-journals-2/#comments Mon, 30 Jun 2014 13:31:24 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2309 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses law journals. All law schools have opportunities for students to work on and contribute to a number of student-edited publications. The one usually considered most “prestigious” is the law school’s Law Review (which typically has scholarly pieces discussing legal issues written by professors and legal experts), although there are also a variety of other journals students can join, dealing with specific areas of the law (i.e., sports law, business law, international law). No matter the type of journal you choose, though, taking part in one can definitely help you during and after law school.

Our first guest, Cliff Ennico, is the author of the book Make Law Review. He says that being part of Law Review gives students insight to and training for the hard work that is still ahead in law school, and also as a new law associate. Although Ennico warms that you will likely spend more time with your fellow journal editors than your best friend, he says the experience is absolutely worth it. He also gives tips from his book on writing a case comment and explains how these skills can help either in your attempt to become part of a law journal or succeed in your current journal endeavors.

One of the two law review editors we spoke with for the podcast, Farhang Heydari, is editor-in-chief for the Columbia Law Review.  Heydari believes that it is important for students to be part of any journal (not just the Law Review) because it allows them to develop a great set of skills through journal work that they don’t normally pick up in the classroom. He also says the responsibilities you are given as a journal staff member is a definitely a unique aspect of being in law school that students should embrace.

Finally, our third guest is Omar Ochoa, editor-in-chief of the Texas Law Review at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law. Ochoa says that one of the great aspects of being part of any journal is that it will introduce you to students you may not have met otherwise, which will in turn give you great networking skills and the ability to call upon them when you enter the legal field. Ochoa also says one of the biggest benefits of being part of a journal is being able to sharpen your writing skills, which is a great ability to have when you enter the legal sphere, and believes that being part of a journal can give you an edge when applying for law jobs or judicial clerkships.

Guests:

Cliff Ennico – Author of Make Law Review
Farhang Heydari – Editor-in-Chief of Columbia Law School Law Review
Omar Ochoa – Editor-in-Chief of Texas Law Review at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/student-law-journals-2/feed/ 0 0:13:52 This week’s podcast discusses law journals. All law schools have opportunities for students to work on and contribute to a number of student-edited publications. The one usually considered most “prestigious” is the law school’s Law Review (which typ[...] This week’s podcast discusses law journals. All law schools have opportunities for students to work on and contribute to a number of student-edited publications. The one usually considered most “prestigious” is the law school’s Law Review (which typically has scholarly pieces discussing legal issues written by professors and legal experts), although there are also a variety of other journals students can join, dealing with specific areas of the law (i.e., sports law, business law, international law). No matter the type of journal you choose, though, taking part in one can definitely help you during and after law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
Non-Traditional Students Applying to Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/non-traditional-students-applying-to-law-school-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/non-traditional-students-applying-to-law-school-3/#comments Mon, 23 Jun 2014 09:06:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2303 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

The non-traditional law school student is the subject of this week’s podcast. Our guests will discuss what makes a student “non-traditional,” and will talk about what these students bring to the law school classroom.

Jannell Lundy Roberts talks about the diversity that non-traditional students bring to the conversation of the law school student body. Professors at Loyola, she says, often comment on how much they appreciate the real-world perspectives non-traditional students can bring to classroom discussions; because they often hail from multiple years in the work force, highly diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, or unusual life circumstances, non-traditional students can speak about how their past experiences relate to what they are studying, rather than simply extrapolating on concepts they have read in textbooks. Lundy Roberts also suggests that non-traditional students should visit law school campuses and meet with other non-traditional students before applying or matriculating, in order to fully understand the opportunities that each specific school can offer them.

Casey Ross-Petherick at the Oklahoma City University School of Law says that, when it comes to the application process, non-traditional students can (and should) definitely stand out. She says that reading about non-traditional students’ diversity (in ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, upbringing, or socioeconomic background) in applications allows admissions representatives to see students in a completely different light than traditional “straight-out-of-college” law school applicants. She emphasizes, however, that the non-traditional stories aren’t simply centered around a person’s identity or ethnic background. Non-traditional diversity can be achieved through various means-from working after college for many years or having different positive or negative life experiences, to overcoming adversity or having unusual life goals.

Our last guest is Pegah Parsi. Parsi is a non-traditional student on a variety of levels. She has served in the military during and after college, goes to school part-time so she can also maintain full-time employment while studying, and is going to school to obtain a joint JD/MBA degree. She says that choosing to attend law school years after college has allowed her to truly view the “bigger picture” of her schooling. She is able to enjoy her time in law school because she is not overwhelmed with the law school process, and can see it as a step-by-step path to a greater goal. Parsi also suggests that non-traditional students may have an edge during employment interviews because employers often value her dedication to education and her goal to become an attorney.

Guests:

Pegah Parsi – JD/MBA Student at the University of Maryland School of Law
Casey Ross-Petherick – Assistant Director of the Native American Legal Resource Center at the Oklahoma City University School of Law
Jannell Lundy Roberts – Assistant Dean of Admissions at Loyola Marymount University School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/non-traditional-students-applying-to-law-school-3/feed/ 0 0:12:00 The non-traditional law school student is the subject of this week’s podcast. Our guests will discuss what makes a student “non-traditional,” and will talk about what these students bring to the law school classroom. More... The non-traditional law school student is the subject of this week’s podcast. Our guests will discuss what makes a student “non-traditional,” and will talk about what these students bring to the law school classroom. More... Law School Interactive no no
The Successful Law School Interview https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-successful-law-school-interview-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-successful-law-school-interview-3/#comments Mon, 16 Jun 2014 11:18:58 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2300 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Our topic this week is the law school admissions interview. Though most law schools don’t require or request a formal interview as part of the admissions process, the ability to engage in a successful law school interview is an important skill for all law school applicants to master. It is important to remember that any interaction, formal or informal, you have with a representative from a law school can affect your admissions chances. Therefore, even if you find yourself meeting a law school representative at a relaxed social event, understanding the best interview techniques and how to apply them effectively is important. Being a successful law school interviewee can also ultimately aid you when interviewing for legal jobs or summer internships.

On today’s program we talk to Natalie Prescott, attorney and co-author of Nail Your Law Job Interview; Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions; and Cliff Ennico, co-author of The Legal Job Interview.

Anna Ivey, author and former Dean of Admissions at the University of Chicago Law School, encourages applicants to truly take the “practice makes perfect” adage to heart when it comes to law school interviews. She acknowledges that it can be awkward to speak into a camera or mirror as you practice, but states that knowing how you look and sound when speaking is important. She also provides insights on how a student can succeed in both a formal and informal interview setting.

Natalie Prescott, a practicing attorney and author, stresses the importance of seizing all opportunities to meet with admissions representatives. Being able to meet face-to-face with someone from the law schools you are applying to can be crucial for the success of the admissions process. She also mentions, however, that doing research on the person you will be meeting with and the institution they represent is essential. You should always know whom you are speaking with and pertinent information about their program.

Finally, Cliff Ennico says that interview skills are not only beneficial for conducting effective law school interviews, but also for summer internships and legal job interviews. He suggests that you should aim to portray a relaxed aura during your interview. He warns against talking too much or seeming overeager. He underlines that you want to appear to be a “no fuss” type of person, and should answer the questions as they come with ease and candor.

Guests:

Natalie Prescott – Attorney and Co-Author of Nail Your Law Job Interview
Anna Ivey – Author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions
Cliff Ennico – Author of The Legal Job Interview

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-successful-law-school-interview-3/feed/ 0 0:16:36 Our topic this week is the law school admissions interview. Though most law schools don't require or request a formal interview as part of the admissions process, the ability to engage in a successful law school interview is an important skill for a[...] Our topic this week is the law school admissions interview. Though most law schools don't require or request a formal interview as part of the admissions process, the ability to engage in a successful law school interview is an important skill for all law school applicants to master. It is important to remember that any interaction, formal or informal, you have with a representative from a law school can affect your admissions chances. Therefore, even if you find yourself meeting a law school representative at a relaxed social event, understanding the best interview techniques and how to apply them effectively is important. Being a successful law school interviewee can also ultimately aid you when interviewing for legal jobs or summer internships. More... Law School Interactive no no
Should I take the LSAT more than once? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-i-take-the-lsat-more-than-once-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-i-take-the-lsat-more-than-once-3/#comments Mon, 09 Jun 2014 13:16:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2296 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s program sheds light on the law school admission myth of taking the LSAT more than once. Many students believe that, if they take the LSAT more than once, law schools will average their LSAT scores, potentially putting them at a numerical disadvantage with single-LSAT applicants. However, many students are not aware of a 2006 American Bar Association policy requiring schools to only report the highest LSAT score for their admitted students. This ABA policy drastically changed the way many schools handle multiple LSAT scores, and allowed students greater flexibility when taking the test.

On the program we speak with Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs at Kaplan Test Prep & Admissions; Eva Lana, President of Binary Solution Test Preparation in New York City; and Jeffrey Zavrotny, Associate Director of Admissions at the University of Baltimore School of Law. All three of our guests discuss this misconception and provide students with options to succeed in the law school admission process.

Kaplan’s Jeff Thomas explains how the change in the ABA score-reporting policies can benefit students who have taken the test more than once. He also says, however, that different schools have different policies when it comes to interpreting multiple LSAT scores, and suggests that applicants contact the admissions office of the law schools they are interested in and inquire about their multiple-LSAT policy, in order to make an informed decision when they take the test.

Eva Lana of Binary Solution also has some advice for law school applicants. She suggests that students who don’t think they did as well as expected on the LSAT cancel their score. Lana says she believes this is the best option because students shouldn’t “air their dirty laundry” to law school admissions committees.

Finally, Jeffrey Zavrotny at the University of Baltimore School of Law says that he encourages his applicants to take the LSAT more than once. If an applicant has an “okay” LSAT score and only took the test once, Zavrotny says, he may think the applicant isn’t dedicated enough to try the test again and get a better score. However, Zavrotny also mentions that he and the Baltimore Law admissions committee do not have a standard policy on how multiple LSAT scores are perceived, and says the decision is normally done on a case-by-case basis.

Guests:

Jeff ThomasKaplan Test Prep & Admissions – Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs
Eva Lana – President – Binary Solution Test Preparation
Jeffrey ZavrotnyUniversity of Baltimore School of Law – Associate Director of Admissions

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-i-take-the-lsat-more-than-once-3/feed/ 0 0:09:34 This week’s program sheds light on the law school admission myth of taking the LSAT more than once. Many students believe that if they take the LSAT more than once, law schools will average their LSAT scores, potentially putting them at a numerical [...] This week’s program sheds light on the law school admission myth of taking the LSAT more than once. Many students believe that if they take the LSAT more than once, law schools will average their LSAT scores, potentially putting them at a numerical disadvantage with single-LSAT applicants. However, many students are not aware of a 2006 American Bar Association policy requiring schools to only report the highest LSAT score for their admitted students. This ABA policy drastically changed the way many schools handle multiple LSAT scores, and allowed students greater flexibility when taking the test. More... Law School Interactive no no
JD/MBA Joint Degree https://lawschoolinteractive.com/jdmba-joint-degree-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/jdmba-joint-degree-2/#comments Tue, 03 Jun 2014 12:23:27 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2294 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the joint JD/MBA degree. On the program we have Patrick Chung, a Harvard JD/MBA graduate and current partner at NEA (a venture capital firm in California); Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake Forest University School of Law; and Richard Hermann, co-editor of the Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs.

The JD/MBA degree is a staple at most law schools. This joint degree allows you to graduate with both law and business credentials after only four years of school, rather than the five years it would take to complete the programs separately. Although all JD/MBA programs provide the same outcome, different schools may have different requirements for their joint-degree applicants: Some may allow students to apply for a JD/MBA after completing the first year of law school or business school, while others require students to apply to the program before they begin their studies; some programs may require both LSAT and GMAT scores, while others require only one of the two standardized tests. Given these discrepancies, all of our guests suggest that you contact the JD/MBA programs you are interested in to obtain information regarding specific requirements.

Patrick Chung, a graduate of Harvard University’s JD/MBA program and partner in California venture capital firm NEA, says that combining the programs provided him with multiple advantages. By moving within both the law and business school circles, he was able to meet people in two completely different educational programs and build relationships that he wouldn’t otherwise have had the opportunity of creating. Although that extra year may seem like a long time, Chung states, being able to complete both degrees in just four years can be a very beneficial to your career prospects upon graduation. Even though his current position doesn’t often deal with the law specifically, having both degrees has allowed him to apply new ways of thinking in both the business and law worlds.

Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake Forest University School of Law, says that she has, in the many years since she began her admissions career, seen an increase in the popularity of the joint degree. She believes that the economy may be one of the driving forces behind its “hype.” Nutt states that having both degrees can offer greater career opportunities for students, and that it may be what students need in order to obtain their “dream job.” She also suggests that students who are trying to decide if the joint-degree path is right for them should speak with professionals in both the business and law fields.

Finally, Richard Hermann, co-editor of the Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs, agrees with Nutt and Chung by stating that the popularity of the JD/MBA degree isn’t only due to the variety obtained within the academic programs, but also to graduates’ increased likelihood of better employment opportunities. Hermann also discusses the different places joint-degree graduates can seek jobs with a JD/MBA degree. Law firms, corporations, federal and state governmental offices, and non-profit organizations, Hermann says, are just a few of the places graduates can successfully look for employment once their studies conclude.

Guests:

Patrick ChungHarvard JD/MBA Graduate
Melanie Nutt – Director of Admissions and Financial Aid – Wake Forest University School of Law
Richard Hermann – Co-Editor, Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/jdmba-joint-degree-2/feed/ 0 0:15:26 This week’s podcast discusses the joint JD/MBA degree. On the program we have Patrick Chung, a Harvard JD/MBA graduate and current partner at NEA (a venture capital firm in California); Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake[...] This week’s podcast discusses the joint JD/MBA degree. On the program we have Patrick Chung, a Harvard JD/MBA graduate and current partner at NEA (a venture capital firm in California); Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake Forest University School of Law; and Richard Hermann, co-editor of the Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs. More... Law School Interactive no no
Law School – Beyond the Classroom https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom-3/#comments Wed, 21 May 2014 11:21:12 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2292 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast explores student life in law school. We discuss the need for and benefits of involvement in student organizations while attending law school.

Deans Laura Ferrari and Janet Stearns both emphasize that being involved in life outside of the classroom during law school is important. They discuss how participating in different organizations can offer many networking opportunities for students, as well as being the conduit to involvement in aspects of the law in which you may not be able to take a class. Student organizations, they state, allow you to add variety and spice to the set curriculum of your 1L year.

However, Dean Ferrari and Dean Stearns also believe that working hard to maintain a good balance between academic requirement and extracurricular involvement is important. Students, they say, should make sure they are not overwhelmed with their student organization commitments, and can still focus on their academics.

Our student guest is Kent Lloyd, a member of the Penn State Law Class of 2010 and the Vice Chair on the American Bar Association Student Law Division. He echoes the advice of Deans Ferrari and Stearns, but also offers advice to students interested in becoming involved in law school student organizations. He emphasizes the importance of not just signing up for organizations, but also reaching out to the current student leaders of each group and inquiring what would be required of 1L and 2L students who want to become involved. Student life, he suggests, can be a valuable addition to your law school career, when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations.

Guests:

Laura Ferrari – Dean of Students – Suffolk University Law School
Janet Stearns – Dean of Students – University of Miami Law School
Kent Lloyd – Vice Chair of the American Bar Association Student Law Division and Third-Year Law Student at Penn State’s Dickinson School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom-3/feed/ 0 0:10:44 This week’s podcast explores the importance of being involved in student organizations while attending law school. Student life can be a valuable addition to your law school career when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations. M[...] This week’s podcast explores the importance of being involved in student organizations while attending law school. Student life can be a valuable addition to your law school career when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations. More... Law School Interactive no no
Day in the Life of a Law Student https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-11/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-11/#comments Wed, 14 May 2014 08:01:52 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2290 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast features three current law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school.

The students featured in this program are Naziol Nazarinia, an upcoming 2L at Thomas Jefferson school of law and current Intellectual Property Fellow; Lauren Ellisberg, a recent graduate from New York Law School who hopes to work in the public sector; and Heather Shafer, a student in the 2012 graduating class at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-11/feed/ 0 0:21:25 This week's podcast features three current law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school. More... This week's podcast features three current law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
How Can I Pay for Law School? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-i-pay-for-law-school-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-i-pay-for-law-school-2/#comments Tue, 06 May 2014 12:36:57 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2286 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick (Director of Student Finance for the University of Connecticut Law School). Our experts comment on a variety of topics and ideas for students to consider when figuring out how to pay for law school.

Kim Clark says there are three things to consider when deciding about law school in general: Do you want to spend three years at law school? How are you going to pay for it? And, most importantly, what is going to happen once you graduate?

Joe Russo emphasizes the importance of remaining realistic with your chances of being admitted into law school and then paying off the loans you accrue when paying for it. His best piece of advice resonates of an old adage: If you don’t have to borrow, don’t borrow. He stresses that if you “live like a lawyer” (i.e., expensive housing, lavish meals, unnecessary expenditures) when you are a law student, you will live like a law student when you are a lawyer. He states that if students must borrow in order to live while in law school, they should do so sparingly and never over-borrow.

Finally, Roberta Frick goes over a variety of repayment plans that will benefit borrowers when they leave law school. She goes over loan forgiveness options and also discusses income based repayment plans (LRAPs) that allow borrowers to significantly reduce their monthly loan payments and have them be based on their income instead of their loan balance due.

Guests:

Kim Clark – Lead Education Writer – US News and World Report (Best Law Schools)
Joe Russo – Director of Student Financial Strategies – University of Notre Dame
Roberta Frick – Director of Student Finance – University of Connecticut Law School

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-i-pay-for-law-school-2/feed/ 0 0:15:26 This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick ([...] This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick (Director of Student Finance for the University of Connecticut Law School). Our experts comment on a variety of topics and ideas for students to consider when figuring out how to pay for law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
Public Interest Scholarship Programs https://lawschoolinteractive.com/public-interest-scholarship-programs-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/public-interest-scholarship-programs-2/#comments Mon, 31 Mar 2014 08:00:46 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2279 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at public interest scholarship programs. We’ll hear from experts Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com; Beth Hansen, Director of Career Services at BYU Law School; and Elizabeth Dunn, Director of Public Service Careers and Pro Bono programs at Villanova Law School.

Heather Jarvis tells us that some law schools, such as BYU and Villanova, have dedicated public interest scholarship programs, although they often vary in scope and nature. She suggests that those students interested in pursuing their public interest goals during law school take a look at clinical opportunities and public service student organizations.

Beth Hansen talks about the public service scholarship program at BYU Law School, describing it as one that seeks to “bridge the gap” for students in public service careers. She also tells us about BYU Law’s public service placement programs, and talks about the strategies and efforts the school has in place to help student find public interest employment. Director Hansen also discusses the public service field as a whole, and encourages all students to take advantage of at least one public service opportunity, although she does warn that students should never consider a career in public service as a “back up” employment plan.

Elizabeth Dunn believes that what makes Villanova’s public interest scholarship program different is the full tuition waiver it offers to students who agree to work in public service for three of the first five years after graduation. She advises that students only take part in these types of scholarship programs if they are committed to public service and understand that they will be living on a lower income level than their law firm peers. In closing, Director Dunn suggests that students thoroughly research the scholarship programs available at the schools they are interested in because every program is different and it is important that the student take part in the program that is best suited to them and their future career aspirations.

Guests:

Heather Jarvis – Student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com
Beth Hansen – Director of Career Services at BYU Law School
Elizabeth Dunn – Director of Public Service Careers and Pro Bono programs at Villanova Law School.

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/public-interest-scholarship-programs-2/feed/ 0 0:11:37 This week's podcast takes a look at public interest scholarship programs. We'll hear from experts Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com; Beth Hansen, Director of Career Services at BYU Law School; and Elizabeth Du[...] This week's podcast takes a look at public interest scholarship programs. We'll hear from experts Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com; Beth Hansen, Director of Career Services at BYU Law School; and Elizabeth Dunn, Director of Public Service Careers and Pro Bono programs at Villanova Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Estate and Trust Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/estate-and-trust-law-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/estate-and-trust-law-2/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 08:04:18 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2277 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the practice of estate and trust law. We’ll hear from experts Jeff Forer, attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP; Robert Mucklestone, attorney at Perkins Coie LLP; and Brian Starr, attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC.

Jeff Forer tells us the practice of estate and trust law focuses on the wills and estates of both living and deceased individuals. He emphasizes that understanding the concepts of income and estate taxes are extremely important for estate attorneys. Forer underscores the importance of doing externships, donating time to learn the practice, and reading materials within the specialty, and says that doing these things will increase your knowledge of and comfort within the field.

Robert Mucklestone explains that students interested in estate and trust law should be aware that there are not many people that fall within the range of a “true estate,” which means that a large client base will likely not be available. Mucklestone underscores the importance of understanding federal estate and gift taxes due to their importance in the field.

Brian Starr begins by saying that his “break” into the estate and trust law industry was a clerkship he did that taught him the ways of the law practice. He believes, as does Forer, that internships and volunteer opportunities are the best way for students to come into this law practice. Starr also explains the importance of building great relationships with your clients, stating that most wills and estates clients will only feel comfortable divulging sensitive financial information to someone they trust. In conclusion, he advises students to begin by working for free and becoming certain that this is the type of law they want to practice before getting too involved.

Guests:

Robert Mucklestone – Attorney at Perkins Coie LLP
Brian Starr – Attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC in Phoenix, Arizona
Jeff Forer – Attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/estate-and-trust-law-2/feed/ 0 0:23:34 This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of estate and trust law. We'll hear from experts Jeff Forer, attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP; Robert Mucklestone, attorney at Perkins Coie LLP; and Brian Starr, attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC.[...] This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of estate and trust law. We'll hear from experts Jeff Forer, attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP; Robert Mucklestone, attorney at Perkins Coie LLP; and Brian Starr, attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC. More... Law School Interactive no no
Prepare for Law School: The 1L Advantage https://lawschoolinteractive.com/prepare-for-law-school-the-1l-advantage/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/prepare-for-law-school-the-1l-advantage/#comments Mon, 17 Mar 2014 08:36:00 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2274 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses how to prepare for law school and get the 1L advantage even before you decide to attend. On the program we will hear from Steve Stein, co-creator of PowerScore Test Preparation’s 1L Advantage course, and Ursula Furi-Perry, Director of Academic Support and adjunct professor at Massachusetts School of Law at Andover and a 1L Advantage course instructor.

Steve Stein begins by likening preparation for the first year of law school to preparation prior to taking the LSAT—although many students do not see 1L preparation as necessary or as important as LSAT prep, Stein believes it can make all the difference in a student’s initial performance and adjustment in law school. He goes on to discuss the 1L Advantage course that PowerScore offers; the course, he says, allows students to both reiterate their desire to attend law school and be one step ahead of their classmates once they get there. A course like PowerScore’s, he contends, gives students a law school edge, allowing them to get a sense of how classes and exams will be in law school, and giving them a “good ear” for the new legal language they’ll be learning there. In closing, Stein comforts students, and tells them that they are not alone as they prepare to go off to law school—many students are in the same position, indecisive about the type of law they wish to practice, and unsure about what law school holds for them—a course like PowerScore’s 1L Advantage will give them a sense of familiarity with different legal specializations, and will give them basic knowledge of what to expect once they step on campus for the first day of class.

Ursula Furi-Perry agrees with Stein about the importance of a course like 1L Advantage—students shouldn’t simply start law school without first taking the time to get acquainted with what will be expected of them. Furi-Perry underscores the serious commitment involved in attending law school, and encourages students to enhance their reading, writing, analytical, and communication skills; take care of any pressing personal matters; and gain some legal experience prior to attending law school. In closing, Furi-Perry recommends that students organize their life, manage their time, carve out time for non-law school pursuits, and not get overly stressed before attending law school. A course like PowerScore’s 1L Advantage, she says, can help students meet these goals.

Guests:

Steve Stein – Co-creator of PowerScore Test Preparation’s 1L Advantage Course
Ursula Furi-Perry – Director of Academic Support and adjunct professor at Massachusetts School of Law at Andover and a 1L Advantage Course instructor

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/prepare-for-law-school-the-1l-advantage/feed/ 0 0:22:05 This week's podcast discusses how to prepare for law school and get the 1L advantage even before you decide to attend. On the program we will hear from Steve Stein, co-creator of PowerScore Test Preparation's 1L Advantage course, and Ursula Furi-Per[...] This week's podcast discusses how to prepare for law school and get the 1L advantage even before you decide to attend. On the program we will hear from Steve Stein, co-creator of PowerScore Test Preparation's 1L Advantage course, and Ursula Furi-Perry, Director of Academic Support and adjunct professor at Massachusetts School of Law at Andover and a 1L Advantage course instructor. More... Law School Interactive no no
Law School Rankings https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-rankings-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-rankings-2/#comments Mon, 10 Mar 2014 08:47:56 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2271 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses law school rankings. We’ll hear from Bob Morse, Director of Data Research for U.S. News & World Report, and Elie Mystal, an editor of legal tabloid Above The Law.

Bob Morse begins by explaining the U.S. News law school rankings methodology. It begins, he says, by looking at school attributes: Students’ standardized test scores and grade-point averages, the size of the institution’s law library, and post-graduate job placement percentage, among many others. Morse also discusses some potential upcoming changes to the U.S. News ranking methodology due to the American Bar Association’s new rules concerning the law school post-graduate job placement data; the way that U.S. News considers and weighs this data within their law school rankings may affect their methodology in next year’s lists. He concludes by mentioning that law school applicants should use the rankings as one of their considerations when choosing a law program, but should not consider it the cornerstone or “holy grail” of the selection process.

Elie Mystal discusses his stance on the post-graduation employment numbers U.S. News uses in accordance with their rankings. He believes that if the magazine follows the new ABA employment numbers requirement, they will be able offer rankings that are more representative of the quality of each institution. Mystal goes on to say that the rankings should be more “outcome-based,” i.e., focused not on the initial prestige of the institution, but rather their effectiveness in helping their graduates secure legal employment. In closing, Mystal offers two pieces of advice for students that are using the rankings to help them make a decision: First, he advises prospective law school applicants to only consider the rankings insofar as the relative prestige of their degree and, secondly, he suggests that students take the time to consider whether saving money by attending a lower-ranked institution is worth it, if they also have the opportunity to attend a higher-ranked institution even without a scholarship offer.

Guests:

Bob Morse – Director of Data Research for U.S. News & World Report
Elie Mystal – Editor at legal tabloid Above the Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-rankings-2/feed/ 0 0:13:55 This week's podcast discusses law school rankings. We'll hear from Bob Morse, Director of Data Research for U.S. News & World Report, and Elie Mystal, an editor of legal tabloid Above The Law. More... This week's podcast discusses law school rankings. We'll hear from Bob Morse, Director of Data Research for U.S. News & World Report, and Elie Mystal, an editor of legal tabloid Above The Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Real Estate Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/real-estate-law-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/real-estate-law-2/#comments Mon, 24 Feb 2014 09:52:10 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2269 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the practice of real estate law. We’ll hear from professors at two U.S. ABA-approved law schools: University of Montana School of Law Associate Professor Kristen Juras, and University of Wisconsin Law School Associate Professor Thomas Mitchell.

Professor Juras starts by presenting us with a broad definition of real estate law, describing it as the “legal rights and obligations of owners of real property.” However, she says that there is much more to real estate law than meets the eye, and talks about its relationship to land use planning, real estate development, finance, landlord/tenant relationships, and easements, as well as its intersections with many other legal practices: Contract Law, Family Law, Estate Law, and Bankruptcy Law, among others. Professor Juras makes a point to talk about the nature of real estate law as primarily a state-based practice (although there are some federal elements to it, mostly notably in environmental law)—this is why, she underscores, students interested in real estate law must give thought to where they want to practice, since that can affect the knowledge they will need. She recommends that students looking to learn more about or practice real estate law not only take “basic” real estate law courses, but also take property-related courses—such as transactional, finance, and tax law—and also try to get practice experience by going to hearings, County Recorders Offices, and reading real estate law blogs.

Professor Mitchell, like Professor Juras, tells students that there is much more to learning real estate law than the basic courses—in fact, he spends considerable time talking about the importance of budding real estate attorneys gaining considerable experience in transactional and business law, and encourages students to look at the practice holistically, rather than just as a single pigeonhole. He also advises students looking to go into Public Interest Law (who he says often don’t feel the need to know much about real estate law) to become familiar with the topic, since non-profits often assist in affordable housing, which directly involves real estate law. He also encourages students to get as much practical experience as possible, and talks about the benefits of clinical opportunities and finding related summer employment (even in a volunteer capacity) to beef up their knowledge and experience. He ends by emphasizing the importance of a strong business and financial knowledge base for anyone thinking of going into real estate law, and also encourages students to look into real estate law-specific programs at the JD and LLM levels.

Guests:

Associate Professor Kristen Juras, University of Montana School of Law
Associate Professor Thomas Mitchell, University of Wisconsin Law School

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/real-estate-law-2/feed/ 0 0:29:14 This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of real estate law. We'll hear from professors at two U.S. ABA-approved law schools: University of Montana School of Law Associate Professor Kristen Juras, and University of Wisconsin Law School Assoc[...] This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of real estate law. We'll hear from professors at two U.S. ABA-approved law schools: University of Montana School of Law Associate Professor Kristen Juras, and University of Wisconsin Law School Associate Professor Thomas Mitchell. More... Law School Interactive no no
What can I do with a law degree? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-law-degree-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-law-degree-2/#comments Mon, 17 Feb 2014 08:01:09 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2267 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What can I do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indiana School of Law; and Robert Nelson, Director of the American Bar Foundation.

Robert Boland came to us with a rather unique story. Although he was a passionate student athlete in college, worked in various athletics-related capacities, and did graduate work in sports broadcast management, he didn’t immediately go into sports agency after law school. Instead, he clerked, then served as an assistant district attorney, confidential assistant to a trial judge, and as a special counsel in antitrust litigation (the most common sports law issue) at two large New York law firms. It was only when he co-founded Global Athletic Management Enterprises (GAME) in 1998 that he began to build his sports clientele, and truly began a fruitful career in sports agency: endorsement and general athletic contract negotiation. He still works in the sports industry and serves as a full-time professor at NYU in the Masters of Sports Management program.

Our other two guests also shed light to other options available to students who graduate with a law degree.
Caroline Dowd Higgins talks about the advice she gives her students when they are just starting law school and are looking for a career path.

Robert Nelson talks about a study the American Bar Foundation did called After the JD and some of the surprising (and not-so-surprising) facts they discovered.

One of the most poignant (and most heartening) things you will learn from this podcast is that with a law degree you can–and many people do–follow your heart.

Guests:

Robert Boland – Professor, Sports Agent, Attorney – New York University
Caroline Dowd Higgins – Director of the Career and Professional Development Office – Indiana University
Robert Nelson – Director – American Bar Foundation

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-law-degree-2/feed/ 0 0:13:52 In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What can I do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Ind[...] In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What can I do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indiana School of Law; and Robert Nelson, Director of the American Bar Foundation. More... Law School Interactive no no
FASFA https://lawschoolinteractive.com/fasfa-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/fasfa-3/#comments Mon, 10 Feb 2014 11:30:49 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2264 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FASFA. We’ll hear from experts Kathleen Koch, Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law; Nicky Fornarotto, Financial Aid Coordinator and LRAP Administrator at Rutgers School of Law–Newark; and Dr. Jeffrey Hanson, owner of Jeffrey Hanson Education Services.

Kathleen Koch begins by explaining the FASFA as a federal form that students fill out to present and organize their complete financial profile for educational institutions. She explains that students must gather their most recent tax returns, W-2 forms, pay stubs, and school codes for any program they are interested in applying to, in order to prepare to complete the FAFSA. Koch also talks about the Student Aid Report (SAR) form that is generated after students complete the FAFSA, and explains that it the summary of the information provided in the latter. She warns that filling out the form truthfully and completely is a must—30% of the applicant pool at Seattle University School of Law, for example, is randomly requested to give more information for verification. Koch’s final advice to students filling out the FASFA is to take their time and complete the form without rushing.

Our second guest, Nicky Fornarotto, begins her comments by answering the frequently asked question, “Do students have to include their parents information on the FASFA form?” Although her answer to this is no, she says that some schools do ask for parental information so students should be prepared to provide it. In addition to the information already mentioned by Kock, Fornarotto also suggests that students know and be ready to provide the balance of their bank account(s). Fornarotto also advises students not to include their home value or current held student loan monies in their asset calculations.

Jeffrey Hanson agrees with Kathleen Koch, and emphasizes that students should have their tax returns readily available when filling out the FASFA. He also mentions that students will receive their SAR (Student Aid Report) after completing the FAFSA, and should receive their financial aid package notifications from the schools they have applied to shortly after. After receiving these notifications, students can then decide which financial aid package is best for them.

Guests:

Kathleen Koch – Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law
Dr. Jeffrey Hanson – Owner of Jeffrey Hanson Education Services
Nicky Fornarotto – Financial Aid Coordinator and LRAP Administrator at Rutgers School of Law–Newark

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/fasfa-3/feed/ 0 0:13:46 This week's podcast discusses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FASFA. We'll hear from experts Kathleen Koch, Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law; Nicky Fornarotto, Financial Aid Coordinat[...] This week's podcast discusses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FASFA. We'll hear from experts Kathleen Koch, Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law; Nicky Fornarotto, Financial Aid Coordinator and LRAP Administrator at Rutgers School of Law–Newark; and Dr. Jeffrey Hanson, owner of Jeffrey Hanson Education Services. More... Law School Interactive no no
Bankruptcy Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/bankruptcy-law-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/bankruptcy-law-2/#comments Mon, 03 Feb 2014 08:24:34 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2261 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the practice of bankruptcy law. We’ll hear from experts Linda Garrett, an attorney in Fairfield, California, and Joanne Reisman, an attorney at Portland Legal Services in Portland, Oregon.

Linda Garrett begins her comments by explaining that the practice of bankruptcy law is centered on helping people who need a fresh start. She also emphasizes the importance of thoroughly researching and understanding this (or any other) area of the law you are considering working in, in order to truly understand what it entails and what will be required of you. Garrett also goes on to suggest that students do their utmost to pick a career field that fits their personality, and states that the only way to find that out is to take a hands-on approach to each field, working in it to get a full understand of its inner workings. In closing, Garrett has some more general employment advice for students, encouraging them to think outside the box when looking for jobs.

Our other podcast guest, Joanne Reisman, explains that bankruptcy law isn’t always taught in law school but that, if you are interested in the practice, there are things to do to prepare, such as taking taxation courses taking part in bankruptcy or foreclosure clinics. Reisman agrees with Garrett, and says that the best way to learn any practice of law is to immerse yourself in it, perhaps by interning in an office that practices the specialty. She underscores the importance of getting practical experience in the field before committing to it, and recommends that students get as much experience as possible.

Guests:

Linda Garrett – Attorney at Law Office of Linda C. Garrett
Joanne Reisman – Attorney at Portland Legal Services

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/bankruptcy-law-2/feed/ 0 0:21:39 This week's podcast discusses the practice of bankruptcy law. We'll hear from experts Linda Garrett, an attorney in Fairfield, California, and Joanne Reisman, an attorney at Portland Legal Services in Portland, Oregon. More... This week's podcast discusses the practice of bankruptcy law. We'll hear from experts Linda Garrett, an attorney in Fairfield, California, and Joanne Reisman, an attorney at Portland Legal Services in Portland, Oregon. More... Law School Interactive no no
Law School Application Letters of Recommendation https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-application-letters-of-recommendation/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-application-letters-of-recommendation/#comments Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:43 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2258 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses letters of recommendation in the law school application. The letter of recommendation can be a telling aspect of any application because it can show the relationship between an applicant and a third party. It gives an applicant’s mentor, professor or friend the ability to explain to an admissions representative why they might be a better candidate than other similarly-situated applicants.

On the program we have Heike Spahn, Senior Consultant with admissions consulting company AdmissionsConsultants, Inc., and former Assistant Dean at University of Chicago Law School; Joyce Curll, former Dean of Admission at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets; and Susan Whalley, author of How to Write Powerful Letters of Recommendation and founder of CheckMyCollegeApp.com.

Our first guest, Heike Spahn, says that letters of recommendation are extremely important but won’t compensate for other parts of the application such as a low LSAT score or GPA. She believes that it is very important to make sure the right person is writing the letter of recommendation, and says it needs to be someone who knows you well and is able to speak knowledgeable about your academic ability and character. Spahn suggests that older applicants who have been out of school for a number of years and are unable to receive a stellar recommendation from a former professor ask a mentor or supervisor at their place of business.

Joyce Curll agrees with Spahns comments, and says that letters of recommendation should definitely come from someone who knows you well. Although many students believe that a recommender’s impressive title will take them far, Curll suggests that prominent figures in the community, though they may seem prestigious, aren’t always the best choice. It is better to obtain a recommendation from someone less well-known who can attest to your work ethic.

Our final guest, Susan Whalley, talks about the best type of letter an applicant can receive. She then goes on to say that building relationships with your professors and other academia personnel can be critical if you are interested in going to a graduate or professional program. Whalley also says it is imperative that the applicant give their recommender all the information they can about themselves so the writer can pen the best letter possible. Finally, she suggests that following up with the writers is important, and an essential part of the process.

Guests:

Heike Spahn – Senior Consultant with AdmissionsConsultants, Inc. and former Assistant Dean at University of Chicago Law School
Joyce Curll – Former Dean of Admission at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets
Susan Whalley - Author of How to Write Powerful Letters of Recommendation and founder of CheckMyCollegeApp.com

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-application-letters-of-recommendation/feed/ 0 0:19:28 This week’s podcast discusses letters of recommendation in the law school application. The letter of recommendation can be a telling aspect of any application because it can show the relationship between an applicant and a third party. It gives an [...] This week’s podcast discusses letters of recommendation in the law school application. The letter of recommendation can be a telling aspect of any application because it can show the relationship between an applicant and a third party. It gives an applicant’s mentor, professor or friend the ability to explain to an admissions representative why they might be a better candidate than other similarly-situated applicants. More... Law School Interactive no no
A Day in the Life of a Law Student https://lawschoolinteractive.com/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student/#comments Mon, 13 Jan 2014 08:01:52 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2256 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast features three current law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school.

The students featured in this program are Naziol Nazarinia, an upcoming 2L at Thomas Jefferson school of law and current Intellectual Property Fellow; Lauren Ellisberg, a recent graduate from New York Law School who hopes to work in the public sector; and Heather Shafer, a student in the 2012 graduating class at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student/feed/ 0 0:21:25 This week's podcast features three current law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school. More... This week's podcast features three current law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
LSAT Training On The Go https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-training-on-the-go-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-training-on-the-go-3/#comments Mon, 06 Jan 2014 08:01:37 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2251 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses LSAT training on-the-go, e.g., using flashcards and iPhone applications as a method of training and studying for the test. Our guests today are Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review; Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law programs for Kaplan Test Prep; and Ashish Rangnekar, co-founder and CEO of Watermelon EXPRESS, a company that produces educational iPhone and iPad applications for the GMAT and the LSAT.

Our first guest, Andrew Brody, believes that LSAT training on-the-go should only be used as a supplement to a more rigorous training schedule involving LSAT classes, tutors, and practice tests. He suggests that students can do a variety of things to prepare for the LSAT on-the-go: Listen to podcasts, use iPhone apps, or even change their everyday reading material to focus on a different part of the test on a daily basis. However, he emphasizes that on-the-go training should ideally only be done along with another, more formal, type of LSAT practice.

Our second guest, Jeff Thomas, agrees with Brody and suggests that on-the-go options are good for students who only use that source of training as a supplement. If a student is too busy to prepare for the LSAT using traditional resources such as classes and practice tests, and only uses on-the-go materials, Thomas suggests that they should reconsider their priorities and rearrange their schedule to find time to properly prepare for the test. He also talks about his company’s many on-the-go studying options and their more traditional ways to prepare for the LSAT.

Our final guest, Ashish Rangnekar, says that his company’s LSAT applications offer a convenient way for students to prepare for the LSAT. Rangnekar says that, along with including a great deal of study material in the application, Watermelon EXPRESS also offers the ability to socialize with other students using the LSAT preparation application.

Guests:

Andrew Brody – National Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review
Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep
Ashish Rangnekar – Co-founder of Watermelon Express

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-training-on-the-go-3/feed/ 0 0:13:22 This week’s podcast discusses LSAT training on-the-go, e.g., using flashcards and iPhone applications as a method of training and studying for the test. Our guests today are Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton[...] This week’s podcast discusses LSAT training on-the-go, e.g., using flashcards and iPhone applications as a method of training and studying for the test. Our guests today are Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review; Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Ashish Rangnekar, co-founder and CEO of Watermelon EXPRESS, a company that produces educational iPhone and iPad applications for the GMAT and the LSAT. More... Law School Interactive no no
Entertainment Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/entertainment-law-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/entertainment-law-3/#comments Mon, 30 Dec 2013 08:57:02 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2249 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

This week’s podcast takes a look at the practice of entertainment law. On the program are legal experts Maggie Pisacane, an entertainment law attorney with Frankfurt, Kurnit, Klein and Selz; Larry Zerner, owner of the Law Office of Larry Zerner; and Ken Basin, an entertainment law attorney at Greenburg/Glusker.

Maggie Pisacane, an entertainment law attorney, informs us that entertainment law can be an umbrella for different specialized fields, the most popular being television, fashion, movies, and sports. She warns interested students that entertainment law is a difficult practice to break into, but encourages those students to be diligent in finding a way into an entertainment law practice and learning as much as possible. Once you are involved more closely in entertainment law, you will find it much easier to get a grasp on which different practices are available.

Larry Zerner defines entertainment law as legal issues that involve the entertainment industry, and cites the contractual problems Charlie Sheen is having with his CBS program, Two and a Half Men, as an example. Reading Variety and The Hollywood Reporter can help newcomers become familiar with the buzz in show business, as Zerner also states that law school will not always prepare you for an entertainment law career. According to Zerner, the most useful skill to have in your arsenal is the ability to negotiate.

Ken Basin, an entertainment law attorney at Greenburg/Glusker, says the entertainment law industry is unique and can accommodate a wide variety of personalities. He advises students who are interested in entertainment law to focus academically on intellectual property and contracts. Basin goes on to say that beyond the glitz and glamour, entertainment law is still law.

Guests:

Maggie Pisacane – Entertainment law attorney with Frankfurt, Kurnit, Klein and Selz
Larry Zerner – Owner of the Law Office of Larry Zerner
Ken Basin – Entertainment law attorney at Greenburg Glusker

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/entertainment-law-3/feed/ 0 0:21:06 This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of entertainment law. On the program are legal experts Maggie Pisacane, an entertainment law attorney with Frankfurt, Kurnit, Klein and Selz; Larry Zerner, owner of the Law Office of Larry Zerner; and[...] This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of entertainment law. On the program are legal experts Maggie Pisacane, an entertainment law attorney with Frankfurt, Kurnit, Klein and Selz; Larry Zerner, owner of the Law Office of Larry Zerner; and Ken Basin, an entertainment law attorney at Greenburg/Glusker. More... Law School Interactive no no
Can a master’s degree raise my GPA for law school admission? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/can-a-masters-degree-raise-my-gpa-for-law-school-admission-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/can-a-masters-degree-raise-my-gpa-for-law-school-admission-2/#comments Mon, 23 Dec 2013 08:10:23 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2236 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

This week’s podcast examines the frequently asked question, “can a master’s degree raise my GPA for law school admission?” Guests for this program are Anna Ivey, author of Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions and Heike Spahn, senior consultant with Admission Consultants and former Assistant Dean at the University of Chicago Law School.

According to Anna Ivey, law schools don’t expect applicants to have a master’s degree. If you have a low GPA, another degree isn’t required, but to raise your GPA you might consider registering for undergraduate courses to show admissions offices you are serious about high academic excellence.

Heike Spahn, senior consultant with Admission Consultants and former Assistant Dean at the University of Chicago Law School, says some career fields do require master’s degrees, but happily, being a lawyer isn’t one of them. Spahn suggests that if you have a lower than average undergraduate GPA, you can offset it with an above average LSAT score. She says that a lengthy amount of time between obtaining your undergraduate degree and applying to law school could remove some weight from the importance of your undergraduate GPA. Finally, Spahn reports that if you do have a low undergraduate GPA, school choice is key, and using letters of recommendations to explain underwhelming grades is a standard tactic.

Guests:

Anna Ivey – Author of Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions
Heike Spahn – Senior consultant with Admission Consultants and former Assistant Dean at the University of Chicago Law School

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/can-a-masters-degree-raise-my-gpa-for-law-school-admission-2/feed/ 0 0:14:08 This week’s podcast examines the frequently asked question, “Can a master’s degree raise my GPA for law school admission?” Guests for this program are Anna Ivey, author of Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions and Heike Spahn, senior consultant with A[...] This week’s podcast examines the frequently asked question, “Can a master’s degree raise my GPA for law school admission?” Guests for this program are Anna Ivey, author of Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions and Heike Spahn, senior consultant with Admission Consultants and former Assistant Dean at the University of Chicago Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
LSAT Accommodations https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-accommodations/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-accommodations/#comments Mon, 16 Dec 2013 09:37:00 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2234 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses testing accommodations for the LSAT. Our guests today are Dr. Stephen Mouton, a clinical psychologist and owner of PrivateTesting.com; Dr. Karl Wagner, president of Powell & Wagner Associates, a private consulting psychology practice in Cambridge, Mass.; and Kevin Fritz, a 1L student at Washington University School of Law in Saint Louis who needed LSAT test accommodations when taking the LSAT. We reached out to Law School Admissions Council (LSAT), who creates and administers the LSAT, requesting comment for this piece, but they declined to comment.

Our first guest, Dr. Stephen Mouton, says there are a lot of options when requesting testing accommodations for any standardized test. However, he stresses that, before requesting from the governing body for the exam, students need to make sure they fulfill all the required qualifications. Dr. Mouton also says that students with disabilities should take some time to investigate the accommodations options that are available, in order to determine what will help them succeed on the LSAT.

Our second guest, Dr. Karl Wagner, says that companies like his exist to help students obtain the necessary paperwork and testing required to request testing accommodations. He also advises that students decide if they will need accommodations well in advance of the test, since the evaluation and accommodations request process is a lengthy ordeal that often takes considerable time.

Our final guest, Kevin Fritz, draws from his own personal history with testing accommodations. Fritz suffers from muscular dystrophy, requested testing accommodations from LSAC when he decided to take the LSAT, and did not receive the accommodations he wished to obtain. He now works with The National Association of Law Students with Disabilities, where he is able to help students like himself.

Guests:

Dr. Karl Wagner – President of Powell & Wagner Associates
Dr. Stephen Mouton – Clinical Psychologist and Owner of PrivateTesting.com
Kevin Fritz – 1L at Washington University School of Law in Saint Louis

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-accommodations/feed/ 0 0:00:01 This week's podcast discusses testing accommodations for the LSAT. Our guests today are Dr. Stephen Mouton, a clinical psychologist and owner of PrivateTesting.com; Dr. Karl Wagner, president of Powell & Wagner Associates, a private consulting[...] This week's podcast discusses testing accommodations for the LSAT. Our guests today are Dr. Stephen Mouton, a clinical psychologist and owner of PrivateTesting.com; Dr. Karl Wagner, president of Powell & Wagner Associates, a private consulting psychology practice in Cambridge, Mass.; and Kevin Fritz, a 1L student at Washington University School of Law in Saint Louis who needed LSAT test accommodations when taking the LSAT. We reached out to Law School Admissions Council (LSAT), who creates and administers the LSAT, requesting comment for this piece, but they declined to comment. More... Law School Interactive no no
Should you take the February LSAT? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-the-february-lsat/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-the-february-lsat/#comments Mon, 09 Dec 2013 08:39:51 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2206 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the February LSAT test date. In addition to the February administration, students can take the test at three other times during the year: June, September/October, and December. Our guests today discuss the stigma placed on the February administration, and who should consider taking this test.

Our first guest, Sandy Hayes of Seattle-based Steve Klein Test Prep Company, talks about the negative connotations the February LSAT used to have-connotations she says no longer exist. She suggests that the majority of students who are preparing for the February test are “ahead of the curve”-instead of being late in taking the LSAT for admission in the fall of the same year, she says, her students are actually taking it a year and a half prior to enrolling in law school. She also debunks the myth that the February test is harder than other administrations. The only difference between the February LSAT and the other three dates, she clarifies, is that you don’t receive your test questions with your scores.

Our second guest, Eva Lana from Binary Solution Test Preparation in New York City, says that there are few a things to consider when deciding when to take the LSAT. First, she suggests that students carefully consider the application deadlines for the schools to which they are applying. She also says if you are considering a highly ranked law school, you should make the October LSAT the last LSAT you take, and says that your application should be submitted by Thanksgiving to give your candidacy the greatest advantage possible.

Guests:

Sandy Hayes – Office Manager, The Steve Klein Company
Eva Lana – President and Founder of Binary Solution Test Preparation

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-the-february-lsat/feed/ 0 0:07:29 This week's podcast discusses the February LSAT test date. In addition to the February administration, students can take the test at three other times during the year: June, September/October, and December. Our guests today discuss the stigma placed[...] This week's podcast discusses the February LSAT test date. In addition to the February administration, students can take the test at three other times during the year: June, September/October, and December. Our guests today discuss the stigma placed on the February administration, and who should consider taking this test. More... Law School Interactive no no
Can you work while in law school? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/can-you-work-while-in-law-school/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/can-you-work-while-in-law-school/#comments Mon, 02 Dec 2013 15:17:20 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2222 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses working while in law school. On the program we have Hulett H. “Bucky” Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association; Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP, a law firm in Miami, Florida; and Susanne Aronowitz, Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law.

The American Bar Association has set rules for full-time law school students and their ability to hold full-time or part-time jobs. According to the ABA, “a student may not be employed more than 20 hours per week in any week in which the student is enrolled in more than twelve class hours.” A student who needs or wishes to work more than the ABA’s allotted twenty hours may need to reconsider their options before attending law school on a full-time basis. Today’s guests offer advice and suggestions on how to earn some extra money and experience while still being a law school student.

Our first guest, Bucky Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association, discusses the ABA rule on working no more than 20 hours per week and talks about why the policy was instituted. He says that the rule is enforced so students are able to spend the majority of their time on being a law school student, and working on the start of their legal career.

Susanne Aronowitz, Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law, believes that the ABA employment rule is in place so students don’t develop too many distractions outside of class and school, and can focus more effectively on succeeding in law school. However, she suggests that students get involved with “employment-like” activities within school, such as clinics or pro bono work. This will help them build their résumé and receive legal experience. She also adds that if a student needs a job to help pay bills or stay financially stable, they should work with their school’s Career Services Office for advice and guidance.

Our final guest, Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP in Miami (FL), is also responsible for the professional development of associates at his firm. He believes that not taking full-time employment while in law school is a common sense decision. Because law school isn’t an easy academic program, students need all their time and focus to succeed. He also explains that getting experience in law school is important and building a balance of work and school is critical, however, and stresses the importance of finding venues in which to obtain legal and client experience while in law school.

Guests:

Hulett H. “Bucky” Askew - Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association

Brad Kaufman - Attorney and Shareholder at Greenburg Traurig, LLP 
Susanne Aronowitz - Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/can-you-work-while-in-law-school/feed/ 0 0:13:50 This week's podcast discusses working while in law school. On the program we have Hulett H. "Bucky" Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association; Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP, a law firm in [...] This week's podcast discusses working while in law school. On the program we have Hulett H. "Bucky" Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association; Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP, a law firm in Miami, Florida; and Susanne Aronowitz, Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Intellectual Property Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/intellectual-property-law-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/intellectual-property-law-3/#comments Mon, 25 Nov 2013 13:11:45 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2220 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast we will discuss intellectual property, or IP, law. Our guests on the program are Jerry Fellows, shareholder at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, and Lewis Gould, partner and chairman of the Patent and Trademark Practice Group at Duane Morris LLP.

Intellectual property law deals with the laws surrounding “creations of the mind.” Our guests today talk about two main areas of intellectual property: Patents and trademarks.

Our first guest, Jerry Fellows, says intellectual property law is a specialty that will continue to be strong and could potentially thrive in a legal recession. Students interested in intellectual property law should, says Fellows, develop analytical skills. He also says this practice is a very broad field and offers a lot of opportunities, and lends itself to a wide range of personalities and areas of expertise.

Our second guest, Lewis Gould, says that there are two primary areas within intellectual property law, trademarks and patents, and suggests that students become familiar with both sides of the practice. He says that, often, students are more interested in trademarks because, unlike patents, it doesn’t require an extra bar exam. Gould suggests that students interested in IP law take intellectual property courses beyond the basic survey course during their law school career, and begin planning their academic path early in the law school career so that they can make sure ot have the requirements needed to pass both bar exams after graduation.

Guests:

Jerry Fellows – Shareholder at Greenberg Traurig, LLP
Lewis Gould – Partner and chairman of the Patent and Trademark Practice Group at Duane Morris LLP

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/intellectual-property-law-3/feed/ 0 0:17:52 In this week’s podcast we discuss intellectual property, or IP, law. Our guests on the program are Jerry Fellows, shareholder at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, and Lewis Gould, partner and chairman of the Patent and Trademark Practice Group at Duane Morri[...] In this week’s podcast we discuss intellectual property, or IP, law. Our guests on the program are Jerry Fellows, shareholder at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, and Lewis Gould, partner and chairman of the Patent and Trademark Practice Group at Duane Morris LLP. More... Law School Interactive no no
LSAT Scoring Scale https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-scoring-scale-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-scoring-scale-2/#comments Mon, 18 Nov 2013 09:29:40 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2218 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the LSAT scoring scale. We’ll hear from experts Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation; Andrew Brody, Vice President of Content Development at The Princeton Review; and Glen Stohr, Senior Manager of Product Development for the LSAT with Kaplan Test Prep & Admissions.

Dave Killoran begins by delineating the differences between an LSAT “raw score” and “percentile score,” noting that the former is based purely on the number of actual questions a student got correct on a single test, while the latter pits a student’s raw score against the last three years of LSAT scores as archived by LSAC. Killoran also discusses the LSAT scale conversion chart, which provides test takers with the score they are most familiar with—a number from 120 to 180. Killoran closes by putting to rest a common LSAT misconception: Students often think that their score is based off their performance as compared to other students in their testing center—however, says Killoran, this is simply not true. No matter how your testing neighbor does on the LSAT, he explains, your score will be based on how many questions you got correct on your own test, and not how many questions you got correct as compared to those in your testing center.

Our second guest, Andrew Brody, also discusses the scaled score, and talks about what students can do to obtain that covered 180. He goes a step further in his explanation of scaled scores, and discusses LSAT score bands, and how they can affect a student’s (and law school’s) perception of an LSAT score. Brody, like Killoran, emphasizes the importance of the scaled conversion chart, and encourages students to become familiarized with how it works and how it produces scores–by doing so, he says, students will known more about their scoring capabilities and how to harness them.

Our final guest, Glen Stohr, echoes our first two guests’, definitions of the raw, scaled and percentile scores and numbers. He then proceeds to explain the difference between “tough” and “easy” LSATs. Stohr also answers a question that many prospective law applicants posit by explaining that that the majority of law schools use the highest overall LSAT score, rather than an average of all a student’s LSAT scores, for admission purposes. In closing, Stohr underscores the importance of studying for, and striving to do the best possible, on the LSAT—the score will have an impact not only on where a student attends law school, but can also affect how much financial aid (if any) they are awarded.

Guests:

Dave Killoran – CEO and President of PowerScore
Andrew Brody – Vice President of Content Development with the Princeton Review
Glen Stohr – Senior Manager of Product Development for the LSAT with Kaplan Test Prep & Admissions

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-scoring-scale-2/feed/ 0 0:29:51 This week's podcast discusses the LSAT scoring scale. We'll hear from experts Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation; Andrew Brody, Vice President of Content Development at The Princeton Review; and Glen Stohr, Senior Manager of Product D[...] This week's podcast discusses the LSAT scoring scale. We'll hear from experts Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation; Andrew Brody, Vice President of Content Development at The Princeton Review; and Glen Stohr, Senior Manager of Product Development for the LSAT with Kaplan Test Prep & Admissions . More... Law School Interactive no no
Will international law degrees transfer? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/will-international-law-degrees-transfer-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/will-international-law-degrees-transfer-2/#comments Mon, 11 Nov 2013 15:00:19 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2216 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses international law degrees and their transferability into the United States legal system, i.e., whether students who obtained their legal degrees outside of the U.S. can practice law in America. Our experts today are John Riccardi, assistant dean for Graduate and International Programs and director of the Office of Graduate and International Programs at Boston University School of Law, and Herbert Larson, professor at Tulane University Law School.

John Riccardi explains that, when it comes to international law degrees, whether or not international students can practice in the United States depends on the state that they would like to practice in. Each state, he says, has its own requirements when it comes to internationally-educated law graduates and will have different bar requisites. In order to make the transition in the U.S. legal system easier and more seamless, Dean Riccardi suggests that internationally-educated students consider applying to and undertaking an LL.M. program, which will allow them to not only become familiar with the U.S. legal system, but also obtain a student visa (which they can then transfer to a work visa upon graduation). He encourages students considering an LL.M. program to seek one which integrates J.D. classes into its curriculum—in this way, the student’s U.S. law knowledge base will increase while also making it easier for him or her to find legal employment post-graduation.

Our other guest, Professor Herbert Larson, agrees with Dean Riccardi and reiterates that practicing in the United States for an international law student is mostly up to the regulations and requirements of the individual states. He also emphasizes that most states don’t recognize foreign law degrees and, like Dean Riccardi, recommends that internationally-educated law graduates work towards receiving an LL.M. degree from a U.S. law school and then sit for the bar in that same state in order to maximize their chances of finding gainful legal employment.

Guests:

John Riccardi – Assistant Dean for Graduate and International Programs and Director of the Office of Graduate and International Programs at Boston University School of Law

Herbert Larson – Professor at Tulane University Law School

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/will-international-law-degrees-transfer-2/feed/ 0 0:18:43 This week's podcast discusses international law degrees and their transferability into the United States legal system, i.e., whether students who obtained their legal degrees outside of the U.S. can practice law in America. Our experts today are Joh[...] This week's podcast discusses international law degrees and their transferability into the United States legal system, i.e., whether students who obtained their legal degrees outside of the U.S. can practice law in America. Our experts today are John Riccardi, assistant dean for Graduate and International Programs and director of the Office of Graduate and International Programs at Boston University School of Law, and Herbert Larson, professor at Tulane University Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Hollywood Misconceptions https://lawschoolinteractive.com/hollywood-misconceptions-4/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/hollywood-misconceptions-4/#comments Mon, 04 Nov 2013 08:47:22 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2214 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast looks into Hollywood’s misconceptions of lawyers. We spoke with Michelle King, Creator and Executive Producer of “The Good Wife” on CBS; Elie Mystal, Editor of abovethelaw.com; and Michael Asimow, Professor of Law Emeritus at UCLA and author of Lawyers in your Living Room and Reel Justice.

This podcast gives us insight from three different experts into film portrayal of lawyers. Michelle King creates the portrayals, Michael Asimow researches, writes, and teaches on this subject, and Elie Mystal uses his website to provide critiques of Hollywood portrayals of attorneys.

King believes timeline issues are the biggest inaccuracy Hollywood portrays, and mentions that no one should use Hollywood as their key source of information for the profession.

Asimow discusses the difference between how television and movies portray attorneys, and the evolution of this portrayal since the beginning of the sound era in the 1930s.

Finally, Mystal talks about the reality of law school and being a lawyer compared to how American students perceive Hollywood’s version. He also suggests a variety of ways to get a better idea of what being an attorney entails, rather than relying on “Law and Order” and other popular law programs on television.

Guests:

Michelle King – Co-Creator and Executive Producer of The Good Wife on CBS
Elie Mystal - Editor – AboveTheLaw.Com
Michael Asimow – Professor Emeritus – UCLA School of Law

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/hollywood-misconceptions-4/feed/ 0 0:09:35 This week’s podcast looks into Hollywood’s misconceptions of lawyers. We spoke with Michelle King, Creator and Executive Producer of “The Good Wife” on CBS; Elie Mystal, Editor of abovethelaw.com; and Michael Asimow, Professor of Law Emeritus at U[...] This week’s podcast looks into Hollywood’s misconceptions of lawyers. We spoke with Michelle King, Creator and Executive Producer of “The Good Wife” on CBS; Elie Mystal, Editor of abovethelaw.com; and Michael Asimow, Professor of Law Emeritus at UCLA and author of Lawyers in your Living Room and Reel Justice. More... Fun Law School Interactive no no
Day in the Life of a Law Student https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-9/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-9/#comments Mon, 28 Oct 2013 08:18:58 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2212 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast looks into the daily life of three current law school students. You will hear what their day-to-day schedule is like, why the decided to attend law school, and some of the advice they give to potential and current law school students.

Guests:

Jennifer Dein – Student Body President – Harvard Law School
Carter Alleman – Vice Chair of Student Bar Associations for the ABA Student Law Division – Valparaiso University School of Law
Amanda Kay Seals – Vice President of Equal Justice Foundation – University of Georgia Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-9/feed/ 0 0:32:53 This week’s podcast looks into the daily life of three current law school students. You will hear what their day-to-day schedule is like, why the decided to attend law school, and some of the advice they give to potential and current law school stu[...] This week’s podcast looks into the daily life of three current law school students. You will hear what their day-to-day schedule is like, why the decided to attend law school, and some of the advice they give to potential and current law school students. More... Law School Interactive no no
Preparing for Law School Exams https://lawschoolinteractive.com/preparing-for-law-school-exams-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/preparing-for-law-school-exams-2/#comments Mon, 21 Oct 2013 08:16:37 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2210 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses preparing for law school exams. We’ll hear from experts Mark Spottswood, Assistant Professor at Florida State University College of Law; Edward Imwinkelried, Professor at UC Davis College of Law; and Jessica Simon, Senior Lecturer, Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program, and Director of Academic Support at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Mark Spottswood explains how it is very common for law school grades to be determined by one single test. Because grades may ride on a single performance, says Spottswood, students should take their time preparing for exam. Professor Spottswood finishes his comments by stating that the old adage of “practice makes perfect” definitely applies to law school courses, and that students shouldn’t just study the information but do their best to recall it and apply it.

Our second guest, Edward Imwinkelried, explains that he strives gives his students all the information they need for him to be a “transparent” professor—offering old exams and study guides so students know what to expect when they will be tested. Imwinkelried continues his comments by suggesting that students should strive to see the “big picture” in their classes, and take practice tests so that they are prepared when taking the real thing. Professor Imwinkelried finishes his comments by recommending that students do an exam “dry run” before the actual test, utilizing their outline as their take prior year’s exams; in this way, they will be able to tell if their information is efficacious.

Our final guest, Jessica Simon, agrees with our first two guests and reiterates that most of the law school grades are made up of one exam, and also notes that law school is very different from a student’s undergraduate experience. She goes on to explain that law school exams don’t always test what you know; rather, they seek to find out how students apply what they’ve learned in the course to a practical situation. In closing, Simon recommends that students start their studying timeline at the beginning of the semester and begin outlining in the middle of the semester. She also advises students to pace themselves and make sure they take the time to prepare thoroughly.

Guests:

Mark Spottswood – Professor at Florida State University College of Law
Edward Imwinkelried – Professor at UC Davis College of Law
Jessica Simon – Senior Lecturer, Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program, and Director of Academic Support at the University of Pennsylvania Law School

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/preparing-for-law-school-exams-2/feed/ 0 0:21:47 This week's podcast discusses preparing for law school exams. We'll hear from experts Mark Spottswood, Assistant Professor at Florida State University College of Law; Edward Imwinkelried, Professor at UC Davis College of Law; and Jessica Simon, Seni[...] This week's podcast discusses preparing for law school exams. We'll hear from experts Mark Spottswood, Assistant Professor at Florida State University College of Law; Edward Imwinkelried, Professor at UC Davis College of Law; and Jessica Simon, Senior Lecturer, Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program, and Director of Academic Support at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Admission What Ifs https://lawschoolinteractive.com/admission-what-ifs-4/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/admission-what-ifs-4/#comments Mon, 14 Oct 2013 08:17:39 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2208 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the “what ifs” of law school applications and decisions. We look into why denials, waitlist and deferrals happen and the correct way to react to admissions decisions. We also take a look at other common “what ifs” in the application process.

In this podcast you get the perspective of two different admission consultants (one of whom is a former Dean of University of Chicago Law School), and a current Director of Admissions at a law school. Their perspectives truly give you the inside scoop on ways to handle the what ifs: how to view them, how to handle them, and how to react to them in the best possible way.

Chaconas mentions the idea of full disclosure for both good and bad aspects of your application so your admission decision can be made with 100% honesty. Ivey mentions the concept of interviews – both required and self-requested – and how they can help your application file but could also do the complete opposite if you aren’t prepared. Finally, Nance mentions a variety of ways to make your application the best it can be and how to have the best application in a variety of instances.

Guests:

Anna Ivey – President of Ivey Consulting and Former Dean of Chicago Law School
Jacqlene Nance – Director of Admissions and Scholarships – University of Kansas School of Law
Anne Chaconas – Previous Director of Admissions Counseling – PowerScore

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/admission-what-ifs-4/feed/ 0 0:15:37 This week’s podcast discusses the “what ifs” of law school applications and decisions. We look into why denials, waitlist and deferrals happen and the correct way to react to admissions decisions. We also take a look at other common "what ifs" in th[...] This week’s podcast discusses the “what ifs” of law school applications and decisions. We look into why denials, waitlist and deferrals happen and the correct way to react to admissions decisions. We also take a look at other common "what ifs" in the application process. More... Law School Interactive no no
Federal versus Private Student Loans https://lawschoolinteractive.com/federal-versus-private-student-loans-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/federal-versus-private-student-loans-3/#comments Mon, 07 Oct 2013 08:15:39 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2204 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look the differences between federal and private student loans. On the program our financial experts are Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and founder of www.AskHeatherJarvis.com and Glen Herrick, Senior Vice-President with Wells Fargo.

Heather Jarvis starts by delineating the differences between the two types of loans available to law school students. Federal monies are funded through the government, often have many more repayment options, and have a set interest rate. Private loans, on the other hand, are offered through individual banks, have variable interest rates, and are often stricter and less flexible during the repayment process. Jarvis encourages students to consider federal loans first before taking out private loans, particularly due to the many advantages they offer during repayment. Public service loan forgiveness, which is a feature available only with federal loans, can greatly benefit lawyers willing to work in the public sector. Finally, Jarvis strongly advices students to never borrow more than they need.

Glen Herrick tells students to start with grants and scholarships for their educational funding, then look to federal loans and, finally, consider private loans if money is still needed. Herrick tells us, like Jarvis, that private loans offer few repayments options, although they do offer loan consolidation programs which can reduce monthly payments by extending the length of the loan. Herrick closes by encouraging students to be proactive borrowers, setting up automatic payment plans and constantly contacting the lender serving the loan.

Guests:

Heather Jarvis – Student Loan Expert and Founder of www.AskHeatherJarvis.com
Glen Herrick – Senior Vice-President of Wells Fargo

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/federal-versus-private-student-loans-3/feed/ 0 0:13:40 This week's podcast takes a look the differences between federal and private student loans. On the program our financial experts are Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and founder of www.AskHeatherJarvis.com and Glen Herrick, Senior Vice-President [...] This week's podcast takes a look the differences between federal and private student loans. On the program our financial experts are Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and founder of www.AskHeatherJarvis.com and Glen Herrick, Senior Vice-President with Wells Fargo. More... Law School Interactive no no
Test Anxiety and the LSAT https://lawschoolinteractive.com/test-anxiety-and-the-lsat/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/test-anxiety-and-the-lsat/#comments Mon, 30 Sep 2013 08:24:30 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2202 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

If you’re a “little” nervous about taking the upcoming LSAT, you won’t want to miss this podcast that takes an in-depth look at test anxiety. We will hear from two experts on test anxiety: Dr. Joseph Casbarro, author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It, and Benjamin Moss, a clinical hypnotherapist in California.

Benjamin Moss starts by discussing what he believes to be the root of test anxiety: The test-taker’s overwhelming concern of the outcome. He explains that students are often so concerned with what will happen once the outcome of the test is revealed that they become overwhelmed with the test itself. Like Dr. Joseph Casbarro does later in the program, he discusses the use of breathing exercises to calm the nerves, reduce the stress, and aid in the focus of anxious test-takers. He says he believes that students will soon turn to hypnotherapy in order to defray the stress associated with the LSAT, and perhaps even the Bar.

Dr. Casbarro starts by emphasizing the importance of test preparation. He states that, even if you have breathing exercises and anxiety remedies on hand, you will not perform to the best of your ability if you are not prepared for the exam. He remains positive about anxious students’ abilities to channel their stress and anxiety into fruitful test results, however, and says that, although this stress and anxiety comes from years of habits built during test taking and can’t be changed overnight, it is possible to change and positively affect these behavior and harness test anxiety to a student’s benefit.

Guests:

Dr. Joseph Casbarro – Author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It
Benjamin MossClinical Hypnotherapist

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/test-anxiety-and-the-lsat/feed/ 0 0:14:17 This week’s bonus podcast will take an in-depth look at test anxiety. We will hear from two experts on test anxiety: Dr. Joseph Casbarro, author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It, and Benjamin Moss, a clinical hypnotherapist in California[...] This week’s bonus podcast will take an in-depth look at test anxiety. We will hear from two experts on test anxiety: Dr. Joseph Casbarro, author of Test Anxiety and What You Can Do About It, and Benjamin Moss, a clinical hypnotherapist in California. More... Law School Interactive no no
What is it like to work in a large (or small) law firm? How do they compare? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-is-it-like-to-work-in-a-large-or-small-law-firm-how-do-they-compare/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-is-it-like-to-work-in-a-large-or-small-law-firm-how-do-they-compare/#comments Mon, 16 Sep 2013 02:00:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2200 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the differences between large and small law firms. We’ll hear from experts Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com, Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law, and Abby Armstrong, Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School.

Elie Mystal talks about how the size difference between small and large law firms most often affects how well you will know your coworkers. He also suggests that students don’t focus on the size of the firms when looking for legal jobs—rather, focus on the quality of the department in the specialization you are interested in. Mystal goes on to say that, when deciding on what law firm size to consider, students should remember that larger law firms are often more fast-paced and competitive, while small firms tend to foster a more paced, close-knit environment.

Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law, talks about some of the main differences between large and small law firms: The size of the support staff within the firm, the types of law that are practiced, and the tasks that younger associates are able and required to perform. She mentions that students who are interested in becoming familiar with a variety of different law specializations should strongly consider smaller firms. Dean Huebner advices law students to speak to lawyers practicing in both types of firms in order to get an “insider’s view” on what working at each is like.

Abby Armstrong, Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School, states that the main differences between the two sizes of law firms are the “entrance requirements.” She believes that large firms are looking for students at the top of their class, while smaller firms look at all types of students, and place importance on the level of involvement within the local community that a student possesses. In closing, Director Armstrong says that larger firms often offer a greater starting salary and an in-house mentor, whereas small firms will best suit a risk-taker and “hustler.”

Guests:

Elie Mystal – Editor of legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com
Vicki Huebner – Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law
Abby Armstrong – Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-is-it-like-to-work-in-a-large-or-small-law-firm-how-do-they-compare/feed/ 0 0:21:54 This week's podcast takes a look at the differences between large and small law firms. We'll hear from experts Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com, Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University Sc[...] This week's podcast takes a look at the differences between large and small law firms. We'll hear from experts Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com, Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law, and Abby Armstrong, Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Is Law School Right For You? Getting A Law Degree Later In Life https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-you-getting-a-law-degree-later-in-life/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-you-getting-a-law-degree-later-in-life/#comments Mon, 09 Sep 2013 08:45:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2198 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses attending law school later in life. Our guests are Deborah Schneider, author of Should You Really Be A Lawyer? The Guide to Smart Career Choices Before, During and After Law School; Ruth Carter, a current 3L at Arizona State University College of Law; and Mark Anderson, a current 1L at William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Deborah Schneider, author of Should You Really Be A Lawyer?, suggests that students who are thinking about attending law school late in life should go through four steps to determine if law school is the best step for them: Investigate law school, conduct a self assessment, find out what attorneys actually do, and have real world exposure to the legal practice. Schneider also recommends that students look at law school realistically and with a clear mind. She stresses that, no matter a law school applicant’s age, they should all thoroughly think about their decision before committing to attending.

Ruth Carter, a former therapist and counselor and current 3L at Arizona State University College of Law, believes that students should wait until they are older to attend law school because they can then complement what they learn in law school with their own real-world experiences. She believes one of the top advantages of being an older law school student is the ability to dismiss the normal law school “drama,” and recommends that student focus on learning and networking while in law school, which will provide them added benefits post-graduation.

Our final guest is Mark Anderson, a 37-year-old law student currently attending William Mitchell College of Law. He believes the key advantage of being an older law school student is the life experience his age allows him to bring into the classroom, particularly because he is able to relate his personal experiences with whatever cases his class is examining.

Guests:

Deborah Schneider – Author of Should You Really Be A Lawyer?
Ruth Carter – 3L at Arizona State University College of Law
Mark Anderson – 1L at William Mitchell College of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-you-getting-a-law-degree-later-in-life/feed/ 0 0:19:11 This week's podcast discusses attending law school later in life. Our guests are Deborah Schneider, author of Should You Really Be A Lawyer? The Guide to Smart Career Choices Before, During and After Law School; Ruth Carter, a current 3L at Arizona [...] This week's podcast discusses attending law school later in life. Our guests are Deborah Schneider, author of Should You Really Be A Lawyer? The Guide to Smart Career Choices Before, During and After Law School; Ruth Carter, a current 3L at Arizona State University College of Law; and Mark Anderson, a current 1L at William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota. More... Law School Interactive no no
Are you interested in the field of Constitutional Law? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/are-you-interested-in-the-field-of-constitutional-law/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/are-you-interested-in-the-field-of-constitutional-law/#comments Mon, 26 Aug 2013 07:27:36 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2192 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

This week’s podcast discusses the practice of Constitutional Law. On the program we will hear from William H. “Chip” Mellor, co-founder, President, and General Counsel of the Institute for Justice, and Jeremy Hessler, a 3L at the University of California Hastings College of the Law and Editor-in-Chief of the Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly.

Chip Mellor, President and General Counsel for the Institute for Justice, suggests that students who are interested in this area of the law should know it comes with hard practice but great reward. He goes on to say that students should ask themselves why they want to practice constitutional law because it needs to be rewarding on a deep level in order for a constitutional law attorney to be truly successful. Mellor also points out that a constitutional lawyer is much more than simply an attorney-they are also a legal historian and strategist.

Jeremy Hessler, a 3L at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, and Editor-in-Chief of the Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly, says that, although he didn’t have much knowledge of constitutional law before attending law school, what he has learned in school has definitely piqued his interest. Hessler goes on to say that students interested in constitutional law shouldn’t just limit themselves to constitutional law classes—they should also take courses in any other subjects that they find interesting, as other areas of the law are all rooted in constitutional law. Finally, Hessler credits his growing interest in constitutional law to the Constitutional Law Quarterly at UC Hastings, and advises undergraduate students who may be interested in this path to take classes in political science, history, and U.S. government.

Guests:

William H. “Chip” Mellor – President and General Counsel for the Institute for Justice
Jeremy Hessler – 3L at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, and Editor-in-Chief of the Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/are-you-interested-in-the-field-of-constitutional-law/feed/ 0 0:13:52 This week's podcast discusses the practice of Constitutional Law. On the program we will hear from William H. “Chip” Mellor, co-founder, President, and General Counsel of the Institute for Justice, and Jeremy Hessler, a 3L at the University of Cali[...] This week's podcast discusses the practice of Constitutional Law. On the program we will hear from William H. “Chip” Mellor, co-founder, President, and General Counsel of the Institute for Justice, and Jeremy Hessler, a 3L at the University of California Hastings College of the Law and Editor-in-Chief of the Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly. More... Law School Interactive no no
The pros and cons of LSAT Tutoring https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-lsat-tutoring/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-lsat-tutoring/#comments Mon, 19 Aug 2013 07:56:45 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2190 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

This week’s podcast discusses personal tutoring as a form of LSAT preparation. Our guests are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep, and Ron Gore, attorney and LSAT tutor/instructor for PowerScore Test Preparation.

Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, says the primary benefit of receiving tutoring for the LSAT is the personal, one-on-one interaction students have with their instructors. He also says that this type of preparation is great for the busy student because it allows them to meet with their tutor when their schedule allows, rather than being committed to a particular class schedule. However, although tutoring does have its benefits, Thomas cautions that students should look at the prices for different types LSAT preparation and making sure it is financially feasible for them before making a final decision on their choice of prep.

Ron Gore, attorney and LSAT tutor/instructor for PowerScore Test Preparation, suggests that students should first look at the LSAT and take a practice test in order to determine the best way to prepare for their real test date. He stresses that, only by taking a thorough look at the test are students able to determine what their strengths and weaknesses are, and what kind of preparation might be best for them. Gore advises that students take an active role in their LSAT preparation by knowing and being an advocate for their own particular learning style. Finally, Gore, like Thomas, stresses that students look at all their LSAT preparation options before making a final decision.

Guests:

Jeff Thomas – Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep
Ron Gore – Attorney and LSAT tutor/instructor for PowerScore Test Preparation

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-lsat-tutoring/feed/ 0 0:13:05 This week's podcast discusses personal tutoring as a form of LSAT preparation. Our guests are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Ron Gore, attorney and LSAT tutor/instructor for PowerScore Te[...] This week's podcast discusses personal tutoring as a form of LSAT preparation. Our guests are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Ron Gore, attorney and LSAT tutor/instructor for PowerScore Test Preparation. More... Law School Interactive no no
Benefits of an LL.M. (Master of Laws) Degree https://lawschoolinteractive.com/benefits-of-an-ll-m-master-of-laws-degree/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/benefits-of-an-ll-m-master-of-laws-degree/#comments Mon, 12 Aug 2013 09:00:39 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2188 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

This week’s podcast focuses on programs specializing in LL.M. (Master of Laws) degrees. We spoke with John Riccardi, Assistant Dean of Graduation and International Programs at Boston University School of Law; Matthew Parker, Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School; and Deborah Call, Associate Dean for Graduate and International Programs at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law.

According to Matthew Parker, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, LL.M. students typically seek the LL.M. either to supplement a law degree already obtained outside of the United States or to gain advanced training in order to practice a specialized area of law. Prior to pursuing the degree, Parker encourages students to speak with other graduates, program advisors, and current or potential employers to ensure an LL.M. will actually provide an advantage.

Deborah Call, from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, noted that every LL.M. program will require a J.D. or its equivalent. However, she cautions fresh graduates not to feel rushed to pursue an LL.M. since it can be obtained at virtually any point in a legal career.

Finally, Boston University School of Law’s John Riccardi, discusses the key benefits of receiving the LL.M. and what Boston University School of Law specifically looks for in their applicants. He also mirrors previous suggestions by encouraging students to thoroughly research the programs since some areas of practice suggest the LL.M. while others do not.

Guests:

John Riccardi – Assistant Dean of Graduation and International Programs at Boston University School of Law
Matthew Parker – Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School
Deborah Call – Associate Dean for Graduate and International Programs at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/benefits-of-an-ll-m-master-of-laws-degree/feed/ 0 0:21:27 This week's podcast focuses on programs specializing in LL.M. (Master of Laws) degrees. We spoke with John Riccardi, Assistant Dean of Graduation and International Programs at Boston University School of Law; Matthew Parker, Assistant Dean of Gradua[...] This week's podcast focuses on programs specializing in LL.M. (Master of Laws) degrees. We spoke with John Riccardi, Assistant Dean of Graduation and International Programs at Boston University School of Law; Matthew Parker, Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School; and Deborah Call, Associate Dean for Graduate and International Programs at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Should you take an Online LSAT Prep Course? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-an-online-lsat-prep-course/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-an-online-lsat-prep-course/#comments Mon, 05 Aug 2013 08:12:59 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2185 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

The week’s podcast takes a look at LSAT online preparation courses. On the program are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore Test Preparation.

Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, starts by stating that today’s students require the availability of many different types of preparation for the LSAT. He goes on to say that determining if online LSAT prep courses are the right learning environment for the student is a crucial first step that students must complete before enrolling in an online prep course. Thomas also emphasizes that, although online courses are often more readily available than traditional classroom courses, and often offer greater flexibility, this does not mean that online courses offer less preparation or materials than other types of LSAT preparation.

Jon Denning, Development Director at PowerScore Test Preparation, says that the primary benefit of LSAT online preparation courses is their accessibility. He also says he doesn’t believe there are any true negatives to online courses, but that students must understand the need to be self-disciplined if they choose to take part in this kind of preparation. Denning goes onto say that success in an online preparation course isn’t limited to just one type of student, and that it can be beneficial to those in all different professions and at different points in their LSAT studies. He also mentions that an added benefit of these classes is that students from all over the world can take part in the preparation, and add to the discussion in the virtual classroom. Finally, Denning agrees with Thomas and says that online courses not only allow students to learn the same information as other courses from their location of choice, they also often the same amount and quality of preparation material.

Guests:

Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Jon Denning – Development Director at PowerScore Test Preparation

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-an-online-lsat-prep-course/feed/ 0 0:13:27 The week's podcast takes a look at LSAT online preparation courses. On the program are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore Test Preparation. [...] The week's podcast takes a look at LSAT online preparation courses. On the program are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore Test Preparation. More... Law School Interactive no no
Contract Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/contract-law-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/contract-law-3/#comments Mon, 22 Jul 2013 12:04:31 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2179 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Are you interested in the field of Contract Law? This week’s podcast takes a look at the legal practice of contracts. We’ll hear from experts Frank Snyder, Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Steven Schooner, Professor at George Washington University Law School; and Brian Bix, Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School.

Frank Snyder starts his comments by defining contract law and explaining it as an unusual part of the legal system, and speaks of its practical aspects and the importance of being attuned to the client’s needs. Professor Snyder finishes his comments by likening the practice of contract law with business advising, and mentions that those who are good business adviser will likely enjoy and do well with contract law. He also advises students to investigate all areas of legal practice that they are interested in to find the one they would like to specialize in.

Steven Schooner explains that contract law is a very different law practice than the more common practice areas of criminal, tort, or defense law. He underscores the fact that there seems to be no gray areas when it comes to students and contract law: Students either consider the field fascinating, they don’t. He says that if you find business and bargains interesting, contract law might be the practice for you—and a love of math and numbers helps, too.

Our final guest, Brian Bix, talks about contract law’s connection with many other specialties. Although undergraduate courses will not teach you much about the intricacies of contract law, Professor Bix tells budding law school student not to worry—law school will definitely give you the tools you need to succeed in the field. He ends his advice by saying that to be successful in this practice of law, face-to-face interaction and conversational skill is definitely a necessity.

Guests:

Frank Snyder – Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law
Brian Bix – Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School
Steven Schooner – Professor at George Washington University Law School

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/contract-law-3/feed/ 0 0:19:06 This week's podcast takes a look at the legal practice of contracts. We'll hear from experts Frank Snyder, Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Steven Schooner, Professor at George Washington University Law School; and Brian Bix, Professor at [...] This week's podcast takes a look at the legal practice of contracts. We'll hear from experts Frank Snyder, Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Steven Schooner, Professor at George Washington University Law School; and Brian Bix, Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Should you self-study for the LSAT? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-self-study-for-the-lsat/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-self-study-for-the-lsat/#comments Sun, 14 Jul 2013 15:09:05 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2176 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast goes over self-study options for the LSAT. We hear from the Director of Pre Law Programs for Kaplan, Jeff Thomas, the Chief Executive Officer for PowerScore, Dave Killoran, and Laura Alliman, a first year law student at the University of Tennessee and an LSAT “self-studier.”

One of many options available to students preparing for the LSAT is self-study guidebooks and materials. In the podcast, Laura Alliman discusses her self-studying process and how it worked for her. In her case, when law school became a goal, she decided against a prep course for the LSAT (due to her prior disappointments with MCAT prep courses), and instead bought numerous study guides and practice tests, which she used to achieve her target score.

Dave Killoran and Jeff Thomas both talk about the pros and cons of self-studying, and explain that self-studying, while successful for some students, may not be the right step for everyone. While self-studying can help all students solidify their knowledge of the basics of the LSAT, oftentimes a student will need in-person or classroom help to truly understand the intricacies of the test and continue to improve their LSAT score.

In addition, Dave Killoran mentions that using self-study methods at the start of LSAT preparation can be very beneficial: It can allow the student to determine weaknesses in study habits and preparation, and then allow the student to use classroom or personalized studies to change study strategies.

Finally, Jeff Thomas puts self-studying into layman’s terms by comparing it to physical exercise. When working out, he says, if you don’t eat right and prepare correctly, you won’t see the results on the scale. Similarly, with the LSAT, if you don’t take the time to truly understand the questions you are tackling and get the help you need to master them, you won’t see the results in your scores.

Guests:

Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre Law Programs – Kaplan
Dave Killoran – Chief Executive Officer – PowerScore
Laura Alliman – LSAT Self Studier and First Year Law Student – University of Tennessee

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-self-study-for-the-lsat/feed/ 0 0:09:57 This week’s podcast goes over self-study options for the LSAT. We hear from the Director of Pre Law Programs for Kaplan, Jeff Thomas, the Chief Executive Officer for PowerScore, Dave Killoran, and Laura Alliman, a first year law student at the Univ[...] This week’s podcast goes over self-study options for the LSAT. We hear from the Director of Pre Law Programs for Kaplan, Jeff Thomas, the Chief Executive Officer for PowerScore, Dave Killoran, and Laura Alliman, a first year law student at the University of Tennessee and an LSAT “self-studier.” More... Law School Interactive no no
How Can You Make Your Law School Application Stand Out? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-you-make-your-law-school-application-stand-out/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-you-make-your-law-school-application-stand-out/#comments Mon, 08 Jul 2013 10:00:40 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2169 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses how to put together a “stand-out” law school application. Our guests today are Ann Gibbs, Associate Dean of Administrative and Student Services at Wake Forest University School of Law; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Anna Ivey, founder and head of graduate school admissions for Anna Ivey Consulting.

Our first guest, Ann Gibbs, says that good attributes for law school applications are a well-written personal statement, and above-average LSAT scores and GPA. In the case of students whose LSAT and GPA numbers aren’t exceptional, she suggests that students should focus on highlighting outstanding attributes in other part of their application.

Our second guest, Ann Levine, says there are two ways to stand out on your application: Your experiences, and your overall presentation. She states that the best section to easily stand out in is the personal statement. Levine suggests that a thoughtful or unusual personal statement can go a long way to grab and keep an admission staffers’ attention, but warns against oversharing or “being cheesy.” Finally, Levine gives us her best piece of advice when seeking to have a stand-out application: Be very careful when putting your application together; always make sure to proofread all the text and confirm there are no mistakes.

Our final guest, Anna Ivey, says the most important aspect of any law school application are the LSAT and GPA, but says numbers aren’t the only thing that can make or break your law school chances. Ivey suggests that students without outstanding numbers can still put together a solid application, but may face an uphill battle with a certain caliber of school. Like Levine, Ivey says that the law school application is the one way students have to “prove” themselves to admissions representatives; therefore, they should make sure to do put their absolute best forward, and double-check all the information they include.

Guests:

Ann Gibbs – Associate Dean of Administrative and Student Services at Wake Forest University School of Law
Ann Levine – Author of The Law School Admission Game
Anna Ivey – Founder and head of graduate school admissions for Anna Ivey Consulting

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-you-make-your-law-school-application-stand-out/feed/ 0 0:14:39 This week's podcast discusses how to put together a “stand-out” law school application. Our guests today are Ann Gibbs, Associate Dean of Administrative and Student Services at Wake Forest University School of Law; Ann Levine, author of The Law Sch[...] This week's podcast discusses how to put together a “stand-out” law school application. Our guests today are Ann Gibbs, Associate Dean of Administrative and Student Services at Wake Forest University School of Law; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Anna Ivey, founder and head of graduate school admissions for Anna Ivey Consulting. More... Law School Interactive no no
Political Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/political-law-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/political-law-2/#comments Mon, 17 Jun 2013 08:00:24 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2165 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses political law. On the program we have Kenneth Gross, Partner and Head of the Political Law Practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Affiliates; Craig Engle, founder of the Political Law Group at Arent Fox LLP; and Susan Gallagher, Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Our first guest, Kenneth Gross, explains how political law became a practice after the Watergate scandal of the 1970s. He says political law can cover topics from campaign finance to election regulation, and suggests that, although politics and law are different disciplines, they can sometimes come together for a variety of reasons (i.e., law creation). He also discusses the different fields that students interested in the field of political law can practice and work in.

Our second guest, Craig Engle, talks about the close link between conflict resolution and political law. He also speaks about the importance of having legal political experience for those interested in entering into politics or government. Engle suggests that students interested in practicing political law or becoming politicians visit Washington D.C. for a semester, to truly understand what it is like to be surrounded by all aspects of government.

Our final guest, Susan Gallagher, has an academic’s perspective of politics and the law. She suggests that law and politics, while not the same conceptually, certainly resemble each other in some aspects. She talks about the importance of having a solid background in political law for those students interested in entering into political and government, and suggests that students begin their instruction in that field by majoring in political science at their undergraduate institution.

Guests:

Craig Engle – Founder of the Political Law Group at Arent Fox LLP
Kenneth Gross – Partner and Head of the Political Law Practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Affiliates
Susan Gallagher – Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts Lowell

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/political-law-2/feed/ 0 0:15:15 In this week's podcast, we are discussing political law. On the program we have Kenneth Gross, Partner and Head of the Political Law Practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Affiliates; Craig Engle, founder of the Political Law[...] In this week's podcast, we are discussing political law. On the program we have Kenneth Gross, Partner and Head of the Political Law Practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Affiliates; Craig Engle, founder of the Political Law Group at Arent Fox LLP; and Susan Gallagher, Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. More... Law School Interactive no no
Is The LSAT Writing Sample Important? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-the-lsat-writing-sample-important/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-the-lsat-writing-sample-important/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 08:00:59 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2163 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the writing sample section of the LSAT. Our guests are Eva Lana, President and CEO of Binary Solution Test Preparation, and Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review.

Our first guest, Eva Lana, says the writing sample of the LSAT, though not scored, is important because it is sent to the schools to which you are applying. She also suggests that some schools may use the sample as part of the admission process. Lana goes on to say that, when preparing for the section, reading samples and writing practice essays can be beneficial, and suggests that students develop a strategy of how they will answer the writing sample prompt questions in order to understand how to best organize their approach.

Andrew Brody suggests that students shouldn’t worry too much about this section because they will likely obtain or hone the skills needed for the writing sample during the course of their LSAT preparation. He also says that when students are developing their argument for the writing sample, they should strive to be fair-minded and consider both sides of the argument. Along with these suggestions, Brody underlines the importance of not letting a sample stand out for the wrong reasons (and tells us what those reasons are), and talks about how students should strive come into the LSAT understanding the basic structure of how they will approach the sample.

Guests:

Andrew Brody – National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review
Eva Lana – President and CEO of Binary Solution Test Preparation

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-the-lsat-writing-sample-important/feed/ 0 0:11:17 This week's podcast discusses the writing sample section of the LSAT. Our guests are Eva Lana, President and CEO of Binary Solution Test Preparation, and Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review. More... This week's podcast discusses the writing sample section of the LSAT. Our guests are Eva Lana, President and CEO of Binary Solution Test Preparation, and Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT programs at The Princeton Review. More... Law School Interactive no no
Part-Time Law School Programs https://lawschoolinteractive.com/part-time-law-school-programs-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/part-time-law-school-programs-2/#comments Mon, 03 Jun 2013 08:00:03 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2161 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses part-time law programs. Our guests today are Erin Van Dorn, Associate Director of Admissions at Temple University Beasley School of Law; Anne Richard, Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid at The George Washington University Law School; and Alison Price, Associate Dean and Director of Admissions at George Mason School of Law.

Our first guest, Erin Van Dorn, says that students who have a full-time job or can only devote part of their time to law school are excellent candidates for part-time law programs. She also says that the application process for both full-time and part-time law school applicants is very similar, and goes on to explain that, although a part-time law school program is typically completed at night and takes an extra year to obtain the degree, students should realize that it is still a considerable commitment. She suggests that students considering applying to and undertaking a part-time law program meet with other part-time law students to make sure they will be able to handle the time commitment and other attributes required of them once they matriculate.

Our second guest, Anne Richard, has similar views to Director Van Dorn when it comes to who she believes would be a good fit for a part-time program. She says that students with families and other large commitments might benefit from being a part-time law school student. Dean Richard warns that both full- and part-time law programs are very rigorous and require dedication on the part of the student. She suggests that students understand the time commitment that will be required of them before deciding to attend a part-time law program.

Our final guest, Alison Price, warns that students who decide to attend law school part-time because they must keep their full-time must be very disciplined in order to do both well. She also advises, like Director Van Dorn, that prospective part-time students speak with current part-time students to truly get an understanding of what the program will demand of them.

Guests:

Anne Richard – Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid at George Washington University Law School
Alison Price – Associate Dean and Director of Admission at George Mason School of Law
Erin Van Dorn – Associate Director of Admissions at Temple University Beasley School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/part-time-law-school-programs-2/feed/ 0 0:12:41 This week's podcast discusses part-time law programs. Our guests today are Erin Van Dorn, Associate Director of Admissions at Temple University Beasley School of Law; Anne Richard, Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid at The George Washi[...] This week's podcast discusses part-time law programs. Our guests today are Erin Van Dorn, Associate Director of Admissions at Temple University Beasley School of Law; Anne Richard, Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid at The George Washington University Law School; and Alison Price, Associate Dean and Director of Admissions at George Mason School of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Are You Planning to Practice Environmental Law? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/are-you-planning-to-practice-environmental-law/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/are-you-planning-to-practice-environmental-law/#comments Mon, 27 May 2013 08:00:14 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2158 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast, we’re talking about the practice of Environmental Law. On the program we have John Pendergrass, Senior Attorney at the Environmental Law Institute, and Amy Armstrong, President and General Counsel of the South Carolina Environmental Law Project.

John Pendergrass offers great insight into the practice of environmental law, and suggests that students interested in this practice begin by having the basic goal of protecting the environment. He also suggests that core law classes are just as important in preparing for environmental law as the specific environmental law courses. Moreover, he states that environmental law is highly based in science and suggests that students do research on the practice to confirm their desire to practice such a specialized area of law.

Amy Armstrong also describes environmental law as a very specialized practice and suggests that students take classes, obtain clerkships, and undertake jobs to learn more about this area of the law. She explains that she has always been in the field of environmental law and thinks it is important for students to understand how specialized and technical the practice can be.

Guests:

John Pendergrass – Senior Attorney, Environmental Law Institute
Amy Armstrong – President and General Counsel, South Carolina Environmental Law Project

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/are-you-planning-to-practice-environmental-law/feed/ 0 0:15:05 This week's podcast begins a new series for Law School Interactive. Once a month, we will be offering podcasts on specific law practices; this month we begin with Environmental Law. On the program we have John Pendergrass, Senior Attorney at the E[...] This week's podcast begins a new series for Law School Interactive. Once a month, we will be offering podcasts on specific law practices; this month we begin with Environmental Law. On the program we have John Pendergrass, Senior Attorney at the Environmental Law Institute, and Amy Armstrong, President and General Counsel of the South Carolina Environmental Law Project. More... Law School Interactive no no
Advice for Pre-Law Students https://lawschoolinteractive.com/advice-for-pre-law-students/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/advice-for-pre-law-students/#comments Mon, 20 May 2013 15:11:08 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2156 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses pre-law programs. Our guests today are Rodia Vance, Associate Director and Pre-Law Advisor at Emory University’s Career Center; Debra Krumholz, Assistant Dean of Students and Pre-Law Advisor at Amherst College; and Amy Urbanek, Coordinator for Pre-Professional and Pre-Law advising at the University of Utah.

Our first guest, Rodia Vance, suggests that students who are interested in the practice of law should consider attending a university with a well-developed pre-law program. At Emory University, she advises students applying to law school and also leads sessions and informational meetings that educate students on a variety of other pre-law subjects. She strongly advocates that undergraduate students take the time to investigate and select the right law school for them; she emphasizes that finding the right “fit” when it comes to both the city in which the school is located and the educational value the school offers to the student is utterly important.

Debra Krumholz offers three pieces of advice for pre-law students: (1) Do well in school; (2) Take challenging courses; and (3) Follow your interests. She encourages students to take full advantage of pre-law programs because it gives them services for free that might otherwise be very costly. She also encourages alumni to contact their university’s pre-law program if they are considering attending law school later in life.

Our final guest, Amy Urbanek, doesn’t have the same type of pre-law program at the University of Utah that Emory and Amherst do; however, though her program isn’t a “cumulative program” which involves a curricular element, it still offers advising to students, which she believes to be extremely beneficial. She, like Krumholz, offers three pieces of advice to undergraduates as they contemplate applying to law school: (1) Get good grades; (2) Get involved; and (3) Have fun.

Guests:

Amy Urbanek – Coordinator for Pre-Professional and Pre-Law advising at the University of Utah
Debra Krumholz – Assistant Dean of Students and Pre-Law Advisor at Amherst College
Rodia Vance – Associate Director and Pre-Law Advisor at Emory University’s Career Center

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What to Include in Your Law School Résumé https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-to-include-in-your-law-school-resume/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-to-include-in-your-law-school-resume/#comments Mon, 13 May 2013 12:52:48 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2152 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses law school application résumés. Our guests are Anna Ivey, founder and President of Ivey Consulting; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Vanessa Vidal, owner and senior writer for ESQ Resume.

Our first guest, Anna Ivey, advises that students include all the basic information in their law school applicant resume: Contact information, education, experience, activities, and any other personal information the student deems relevant. Ivey says that it is fine to include things from before your college years but says one thing to definitely avoid including is expected statuses or things you have turned down; for example, if you were accepted to Harvard but didn’t go, don’t include it on your résumé. When designing your résumé, Ivey suggests that the formatting needs to be conventional and “very easy on the eyes.” She also says that admission officers care a lot about academic and extracurricular activities so make sure to include everything you have been involved with.

Ann Levine starts her advice by suggesting that students not include high school achievements on their law school application résumé. She proposes that, instead, students focus on including anything that will make their experience unique and diverse. Levine emphasizes that both education and employment information be included in the résumé, and stresses the importance of consistency and careful proofing to avoid careless errors.

Our final guest, Vanessa Vidal, states that law school application résumés and legal résumés are very different. Vidal suggests including personal contact information, work experience, education and bar admissions on your legal résumé. She also suggests that applicants not include computer skills unless the job specifically asks for a detailed listing. Finally, she talks about the importance of ensuring the résumé has a clear objective, only includes relevant information, and is carefully proofread.

Guests:

Anna IveyPresident of Ivey Consulting
Ann Levine – Author of The Law School Admission Game
Vanessa Vidal – Owner and Senior Writer for ESQ Resume

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-to-include-in-your-law-school-resume/feed/ 0 0:19:47 This week's podcast discusses law school application résumés. Our guests are Anna Ivey, founder and President of Ivey Consulting; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Vanessa Vidal, owner and senior writer for ESQ Resume. More[...] This week's podcast discusses law school application résumés. Our guests are Anna Ivey, founder and President of Ivey Consulting; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Vanessa Vidal, owner and senior writer for ESQ Resume. More... Law School Interactive no no
Logical Reasoning on the LSAT https://lawschoolinteractive.com/logical-reasoning-on-the-lsat-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/logical-reasoning-on-the-lsat-2/#comments Mon, 06 May 2013 12:21:20 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2144 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. Our guests are Eva Lana, President and CEO of Binary Solution, a test preparation company; Nikki Siclunov, Managing Director of PowerScore Test Preparation’s New York City operations and co-author of the PowerScore’s new LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible Workbook; and Andrew Brody, National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review.

Our first guest, Eva Lana, offers information about the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. She discusses the differences between the logical reasoning and logic games sections, and says that the wording of the sections are the biggest difference among them. She also offers example words and phrases that can be helpful to students when concluding answers in logical reasoning questions: like, for example, however, rather, because, result in, if, only, less.

Nikki Siclunov, our second guest, defines the logical reasoning section by breaking down its composition and timing. Like Lana, Siclunov believes the games and logical reasoning sections to be very different; major aspect of that difference is the number of questions offered in each individual section. The fifty questions in the reasoning section, compared to the four questions in the games section, says Siclunov, show the importance the reasoning section has on a student’s score. He also explains how important it is for students to understand the differences between arguments and conclusions when preparing for this section, and stresses the importance of slowing down and approaching the logical reasoning questions carefully.

Our final guest, Andrew Brody, suggests that the logical reasoning section is the most important section on the test because it offers the most number of points. He talks about how important it is to practice for this section in order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of how to best answer the questions. He also says that applying the process of elimination when choosing between questions is one of the soundest strategies students can have when preparing for the logical reasoning section.

Guests:

Nikki Siclunov – Managing Director of PowerScore Test Preparation’s New York City operations and co-author of the PowerScore‘s new LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible Workbook
Andrew Brody – National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review
Eva Lana – President and CEO of Binary Solution

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/logical-reasoning-on-the-lsat-2/feed/ 0 0:22:03 This week's podcast discusses the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. Our guests are Eva Lana, President and CEO of Binary Solution, a test preparation company; Nikki Siclunov, Managing Director of PowerScore Test Preparation's New York City ope[...] This week's podcast discusses the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. Our guests are Eva Lana, President and CEO of Binary Solution, a test preparation company; Nikki Siclunov, Managing Director of PowerScore Test Preparation's New York City operations and co-author of the PowerScore's new LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible Workbook; and Andrew Brody, National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review. More... Law School Interactive no no
Transferring Law Schools https://lawschoolinteractive.com/transferring-law-schools-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/transferring-law-schools-2/#comments Mon, 29 Apr 2013 07:00:47 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2136 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the transfer process for law school students. Our guests are Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Joyce Curll, author of Best Law School Admission Secrets.

Our first guest, Anna Ivey, talks about how important it is for students considering transferring to pay close attention to their performance during the first year. Most law programs require the transfer process to happen immediately after the 1L year and will use 1L grades as the primary academic indicator with a student’s admission credentials. Along with the 1L grades, Ivey suggests that the availability of seats at the school where a student is planning on transferring to also plays a major role. Lastly, she discusses how a student’s professional goals should be one of the primary factors students consider when determining if transferring is the best move for them.

Ann Levine, our second guest, talks about some of the reasons why students should transfer law schools, in particular “{moving up” in the rankings. She, like Ivey, says that the transfer process can be unpredictable because there are no set requirements for transferring students nor a set number of slots that are available to transfer students from year to year. Along with professional goals, Levine suggests that location, reputation, and job opportunities should be other factors students should consider when deciding if transferring is the right move for them, and where to transfer.

Our final guest, Joyce Curll, says that if a student wants to transfer law schools, they should. She suggests that you should make a decision based on what makes sense for your personal goals and happiness. Finally, she talks about the importance of building yourself as a professional student during your first year of school, and understanding that law schools will look at grades and accomplishments when considering your transfer application.

Guests:

Anna Ivey – Author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions
Ann Levine – Author of The Law School Admission Game
Joyce Curll – Author of Best Law School Admission Secrets

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/transferring-law-schools-2/feed/ 0 0:16:48 This week’s podcast discusses the transfer process for law school students. Our guests are Anna Ivey, author of the Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Joyce Curll, author of Best Law School[...] This week’s podcast discusses the transfer process for law school students. Our guests are Anna Ivey, author of the Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions; Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game; and Joyce Curll, author of Best Law School Admission Secrets. More... Law School Interactive no no
Paying Off Your Student Loans https://lawschoolinteractive.com/paying-off-your-student-loans-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/paying-off-your-student-loans-2/#comments Mon, 22 Apr 2013 07:00:54 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2135 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses paying off student loans. Our guests are Heather Jarvis, attorney and Senior Program Manager for Law School Advocacy at Equal Justice Works; Edie Irons, expert on income-based repayment and public service loan forgiveness, and Communications Director at the Institute for College Access & Success; and Glen Herrick, Senior Vice President of Risk Management at Wells Fargo in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Our first guest, Heather Jarvis, attorney and Senior Program Manager for Law School Advocacy at Equal Justice Works, starts by discussing the timeline students typically follow when they start paying off student loans. She also discusses the different payment plans students can choose from when repaying their student debt, and spends time covering income-based repayment, which bases a student’s monthly loan payment off his or her current salary. She also stresses the importance of keeping in constant communication with your student loan lender.

Edie Irons, Communications Director at the Institute of College Access & Success, also discusses different student loan repayment options and suggests that thorough conversations with your lender are of utmost importance when deciding on the best repayment option for you. She also offers information on loan forgiveness programs, which allow students to get some of their loans forgiven based on the career they choose after graduation.

Our final guest, Glen Herrick, Senior Vice President of Risk Management at Wells Fargo (SD), talks about privately-funded education loans such as the ones offered by his institution. Herrick suggests first exhausting all possible funding through federal channels before taking out private loans. He also underlines the importance of making sure to manage your debt.

Guests:

Edie Irons – Communications Director at the Institute of College Access & Success
Heather Jarvis – Attorney and Senior Program Manager for Law School Advocacy at Equal Justice Works
Glen Herrick – Senior Vice President for Risk Management at Wells Fargo (Sioux Falls, SD)

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/paying-off-your-student-loans-2/feed/ 0 0:22:59 This week’s podcast discusses paying off student loans. Our guests are Heather Jarvis, attorney and Senior Program Manager for Law School Advocacy at Equal Justice Works; Edie Irons, expert on income-based repayment and public service loan forgiven[...] This week’s podcast discusses paying off student loans. Our guests are Heather Jarvis, attorney and Senior Program Manager for Law School Advocacy at Equal Justice Works; Edie Irons, expert on income-based repayment and public service loan forgiveness, and Communications Director at the Institute for College Access & Success; and Glen Herrick, Senior Vice President of Risk Management at Wells Fargo in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. More... Law School Interactive no no
LSAT Reading Comprehension https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-reading-comprehension-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-reading-comprehension-3/#comments Mon, 15 Apr 2013 07:00:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2134 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the reading comprehension section of the LSAT. On the program we have Steve Stein, co-author of PowerScore’s LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible; Andrew Brody, the National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review, and Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions.

The reading comprehension section is often seen as the “easiest” part of the LSAT due to the presence of similar verbally-oriented sections on other standardized tests. However, students shouldn’t overlook this section as they prepare to take the test. Our experts discuss how to prepare for reading comprehension on the LSAT, misconceptions of the reading comprehension section, and how to become a successful reading comprehension test taker.

Our first guest, Steve Stein, co-author of PowerScore’s LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible, says that one of the biggest misconceptions of the reading comprehension section is that it essentially tests a student’s basic reading level. In fact, it tests how a student reads, not just how well he or she reads. Stein suggests that students practice for this section by going “off the clock” and learning to recognize what they are reading and what parts of the essays questions reference. He also recommends that test takers focus on specific parts of the passages so that when they answer questions, they understand and know where to find the most pertinent information.

Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review, says that students tend to not practice for LSAT reading comprehension because of the misplaced sense of familiarity with the section, but he doesn’t think this is advisable. He suggests adopting an individualized approach to the section and taking the time to determine which aspects of the section you are most skilled at prior to taking the test. He also believes a great way to practice for this section is by making your everyday reading material similar to the articles you will see on the LSAT.

Our final guest, Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, suggests that “active reading” is a great way to succeed on this section. He suggests that students read the passage first and then find key words that they believe can help with answering the questions. Thomas also mentions that understanding the order the passages are in can be crucial to your success on the section, since this will allow you work on the “easier” passages first, where you are most likely to get the greatest number of correct answers.

Steve Stein – Co-author of PowerScore’s LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible
Jeff Thomas – Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Andrew Brody - National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-reading-comprehension-3/feed/ 0 0:17:49 This week’s podcast discusses the reading comprehension section of the LSAT. On the program we have Steve Stein, co-author of PowerScore’s LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible; Andrew Brody, the National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Prince[...] This week’s podcast discusses the reading comprehension section of the LSAT. On the program we have Steve Stein, co-author of PowerScore’s LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible; Andrew Brody, the National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review, and Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions. More... Law School Interactive no no
Large Law Schools Versus Small Law Schools https://lawschoolinteractive.com/large-law-schools-versus-small-law-schools-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/large-law-schools-versus-small-law-schools-2/#comments Mon, 08 Apr 2013 08:00:57 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2133 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the differences between law schools with a large student bodies and smaller student communities. Our guests on the program are Melissa Fruscione, Director of Admissions the University of Notre Dame Law School; Mark West, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan Law School; and Ian Graham, attorney and author of Unbillable Hours. Our experts today discuss the factors students should consider when deciding on a law school based on school size and student population numbers.

Our first guest, Melissa Fruscione, Director of Admissions at the University of Notre Dame Law School (a smaller program with less than 600 full-time students), talks about the benefits and disadvantages of both smaller and larger programs, and talks about how student life can change depending on the size of the school you attend. At a smaller school like Notre Dame Law, she says, the size of the student body allows student organizations to be very focused, and makes leadership roles within those organizations more available to a greater percentage of students. Director Fruscione advises students who are looking at law school of vastly different sizes to sit in on a class and observe the student-teacher interaction at each school to really get a feel for the school environment. She suggests that, after each visit, students seriously consider whether they would be comfortable in the environment they observed.

Mark West, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan Law School (a larger program with over 1,000 full-time students), suggests that the quality of the school is an important factor, regardless of the size of the program. Although Michigan is a larger school, he explains, they divide up their students to make the sections within each class have a smaller feel. His final piece of advice for students is similar to that offered by Notre Dame’s Dean Fruscione: Get a feel for the schools you’re interested in beyond what they look like on paper. To achieve that, he suggests talking with students and alumni of each school.

Our final guest, Ian Graham, attorney and author of Unbillable Hours, says that students should take the numbers of students in a law school program with a grain of salt. He suggests that even though a school is large, it doesn’t mean that classrooms will be abnormally large-in many cases, much like Michigan’s Dean West points out, the size of the sections can make a school seem smaller than it is. Graham also suggests that a law school education has much more to do with the effort students put into it, and less to do with the size of the school.

Guests:

Mark West – Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan Law School
Melissa Fruscione – Director of Admissions at the University of Notre Dame Law School
Ian Graham – Attorney and author of Unbillable Hours

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/large-law-schools-versus-small-law-schools-2/feed/ 0 0:24:01 This week’s podcast discusses the differences between law schools with a large student bodies and smaller student communities. Our guests on the program are Melissa Fruscione, Director of Admissions the University of Notre Dame Law School; Mark West[...] This week’s podcast discusses the differences between law schools with a large student bodies and smaller student communities. Our guests on the program are Melissa Fruscione, Director of Admissions the University of Notre Dame Law School; Mark West, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan Law School; and Ian Graham, attorney and author of Unbillable Hours. Our experts today discuss the factors students should consider when deciding on a law school based on school size and student population numbers. More... Law School Interactive no no
How to Approach the LSAT Logic Games https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-approach-the-lsat-logic-games/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-approach-the-lsat-logic-games/#comments Mon, 01 Apr 2013 10:20:53 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2129 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the logic games section of the LSAT.  On the program we have Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation, and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses; Jeff Thomas, Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Andrew Brody, National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review.

The logic games section of the LSAT is often seen as the most foreign and daunting part of the test, and with good reason: No other standardized test has questions even closely resembling LSAT logic games. Our experts discuss how to prepare for the section, common logic games misconceptions, and how to become an expert on the topic.

Our first guest, Dave Killoran (CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation, and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses), says the logic games section is different than anything students will see on another standardized test or even in law school.  He talks about how you can increase your logic games section success by taking the time to determine which problem-solving approaches work best for you. He also offers advice on how classes, tutors, and books can help students achieve logic games victories.

Our next guest, Jeff Thomas (Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions), says the logic games section requires no specific knowledge base; he says it is a skill that takes time to learn and master.  Along with Killoran, Thomas states that practice is the best way to excel in the logic games section.

Our final guest, Andrew Brody (National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review), says that, even though students may see this section as the hardest, he often sees the most improvement on this section if students dedicate themselves to logic games study and practice.  Brody also offers two pieces of advice that can make students the best “logic gamer” possible: Get the answer on the paper, not just in your head; don’t rush into the question, and take the time to diagram the set-up.

Guests:

Dave Killoran – CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses
Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Andrew Brody – National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-approach-the-lsat-logic-games/feed/ 0 0:23:32 This week’s podcast discusses the logic games section of the LSAT.  On the program we have Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation, and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses; Jeff Thomas, Director of Pre-Law Program[...] This week’s podcast discusses the logic games section of the LSAT.  On the program we have Dave Killoran, CEO of PowerScore Test Preparation, and author of the Logic Games Bible and PowerScore’s LSAT courses; Jeff Thomas, Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Andrew Brody, National Content Director of LSAT Programs for The Princeton Review. More... Law School Interactive no no
What is a 3 + 3 Law Program and is it Right for You? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-is-a-3-3-law-program-and-is-it-right-for-you/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-is-a-3-3-law-program-and-is-it-right-for-you/#comments Mon, 25 Mar 2013 14:08:37 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2126 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the combination of an undergraduate B.A. (or B.S.) and graduate J.D. Often referred to as a 3+3 program, this course of study typically takes a combined six years to complete, and allows students to earn a bachelor and law degree from either the same university or from the student’s home university and another institution the student’s home university has partnered with.

Our guests today are Ed Munn Sanchez, Associate Dean at the University of South Carolina Honors College; Allen Woll, Associate Dean at the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Honors College at Rutgers University; and Robert Schwartz, Director of the Office of Pre-professional Advisement and Fellowships at Adelphi University.

Our first guest, Ed Munn Sanchez, Associate Dean at the University of South Carolina Honors College, explains why he believes high school and college students who know they want to pursue a career in law should consider a joint degree, but he also discusses how the joint degree may not be a good option for everyone. He also discusses the benefits of USC’s joint programs.

Allen Woll, Associate Dean at the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Honors College at Rutgers University, voices opinions similar to Sanchez’s, and also points out that one of the great benefits of the 3+3 program is the ability to receive both degrees in one less year than the standard time. Woll also discusses some of the requirements for a 3+3 program, including a high GPA and (potentially) having to take the LSAT. He also makes sure to point out that, although students may be accepted into a 3+3 program straight out of high school, they still have the ability to opt-out of the program while in college, should they decide it’s not for them.

Our final guest, Robert Schwartz, Director of the Office of Pre-Professional Advisement and Fellowships at Adelphi University, believes that, although the 3+3 program can be great for students considering law school at an early age, it can have downfalls. Robert suggests that losing one year of the undergraduate college experience can be a disappointment to some. He encourages students to thoroughly think about their professional aspirations and prospects when deciding if a 3+3 program is right for them.

Guests:

Ed Munn Sanchez – Associate Dean at the University of South Carolina Honors College
Allen Woll – Associate Dean at the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Honors College at Rutgers University
Robert Schwartz – Director of the Office of Pre-Professional Advisement and Fellowships at Adelphi University

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-is-a-3-3-law-program-and-is-it-right-for-you/feed/ 0 0:17:41 This week’s podcast discusses the combination of an undergraduate B.A. (or B.S.) and graduate J.D. Often referred to as a 3+3 program, this course of study typically takes a combined six years to complete, and allows students to earn a bachelor and[...] This week’s podcast discusses the combination of an undergraduate B.A. (or B.S.) and graduate J.D. Often referred to as a 3+3 program, this course of study typically takes a combined six years to complete, and allows students to earn a bachelor and law degree from either the same university or from the student’s home university and another institution the student’s home university has partnered with. More... Law School Interactive no no
Decoding the Meaning of Your LSAT Score https://lawschoolinteractive.com/decoding-the-meaning-of-your-lsat-score-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/decoding-the-meaning-of-your-lsat-score-2/#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2013 13:34:50 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2123 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the meaning of your LSAT score. On the program we have Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review; Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Elie Mystal, an editor at Above the Law, a legal tabloid.

A student’s LSAT score is one of the many attributes that law school admissions look at when accepting incoming 1L students. The score can be determining factor for admission to or rejection from a law program. Our guests today discuss how what an LSAT score means, and attempt to debunk the myth of the LSAT as an IQ test and a measure of overall intelligence.

Our first guest, Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs at Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, explains the history of the LSAT and discusses why potential law school students need to take the exam. Thomas also suggests that, more than anything, the LSAT is the start to your legal education and should be seen as that.

Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review, says that the LSAT score can mean a variety of things-but it all depends on the student. He also suggests that the score’s main purpose is to get students accepted into law school, although it is also used by schools to gauge how a student might do in law school.

Our final guest, Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid Above the Law, discusses how excelling on the LSAT may show superb knowledge in one specific area of the test, but doesn’t indicate someone’s overall intelligence. Mystal believes, like Brody, that an the LSAT score really only determines where a student will be able to attend law school, and not much else.

Guests:

Andrew Brody – National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review
Jeff Thomas – Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Elie Mystal – Editor at legal tabloid Above the Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/decoding-the-meaning-of-your-lsat-score-2/feed/ 0 0:17:35 This week’s podcast discusses the meaning of your LSAT score. On the program we have Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review; Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Adm[...] This week’s podcast discusses the meaning of your LSAT score. On the program we have Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review; Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Elie Mystal, an editor at Above the Law, a legal tabloid. More... Law School Interactive no no
Personal Statements https://lawschoolinteractive.com/personal-statements-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/personal-statements-2/#comments Mon, 11 Mar 2013 13:33:18 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2120 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the law school application personal statement. The personal statement is a vital part of the law school application. It allows students to tell stories taken from their life and personal experiences and present multiple facets of their personality to law school admissions officers.

Our guests today are Paul Bodine, admissions consultant and author of Great Personal Statements for Law School and Perfect Phrases for Law School Admissions; Alan Gelb, Author of Conquering the College Admission Essay in 10 Steps; and Linda Abraham, founder and CEO of admissions consulting company Accepted.com.

Our first guest, Paul Bodine, believes that all personal statement should demonstrate authenticity, self-awareness, vivid writing, hard work, and creativity. He also suggests some topics that students shouldn’t write about when brainstorming their personal statement. He suggests that these “do not use” topics are frequently employed by applicants, and can often become repetitive and unimpressive for admissions officers.

Alan Gelb voices opinions similar to Bodine’s, and suggests that students should focus on what makes them unique when writing their personal statement. He stresses that giving yourself enough time to write, edit, and brainstorm your personal statement is crucial.

Our final guest, Linda Abraham, believes that, although creating an impressive personal statement is important, it is not as important as solid LSAT score and GPA. However, even though the statement doesn’t hold as much as weight as numerical indicators, students should make sure to remain focused and distinctive in their personal statement, since a unique and insightful essay can definitely make you stand out above the rest of the applicant pool.

Guests:

Alan Gelb - Author of Conquering the College Admission Essay in 10 Steps
Paul Bodine – admissions consultant and author of Great Personal Statements for Law School and Perfect Phrases for Law School Acceptance
Linda Abraham – Founder and CEO of Accepted.Com

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/personal-statements-2/feed/ 0 0:16:11 This week’s podcast discusses the law school application personal statement. The personal statement is a vital part of the law school application. It allows students to tell stories taken from their life and personal experiences and present multip[...] This week’s podcast discusses the law school application personal statement. The personal statement is a vital part of the law school application. It allows students to tell stories taken from their life and personal experiences and present multiple facets of their personality to law school admissions officers. More... Law School Interactive no no
Black Marks on Law School Applications https://lawschoolinteractive.com/black-marks-on-law-school-applications-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/black-marks-on-law-school-applications-2/#comments Mon, 04 Mar 2013 13:18:51 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2117 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses “black” or “red” marks on your law school applications. Our guests on the program are Susan Krinsky, Associate Dean of Admissions at Tulane University Law School; Joyce Curll, former Dean of Admissions at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law, and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets; and Collins Byrd, Assistant Dean of Admissions at University of Iowa College of Law.

The negative aspects, also known as “black” or “red” marks, on a student’s law school application can range from the small (such as a failed class in college) to the extreme (such as a felony conviction for forgery). Our experts today discuss how students could potentially receive admission to law school even with a problem on their record, and how they should disclose this negative information on their applications.

Our first guest, Assistant Dean of Admissions at University of Iowa College of Law Collins Byrd, says that students should always disclose everything on their law school applications. He wants applicants to know that, although they may feel their actions are uniquely negative, many law school administrators have seen these problems on applications before. He warns, however, that without full disclosure, it’s hard to fully trust an applicant.

Susan Krinsky, Associate Dean of Admissions at Tulane University Law School, says that it is very important to discuss whatever issue you may have on your application-but that going overboard on your explanations can be a problem as well. She also talks about the differences between admission to law school and a state Bar, and comments that, while a law school may be willing to overlook past indiscretions and offer a student with a negative past admission, the Bar may still deny a law graduate’s eligibility to sit for the Bar Exam.

Our final guest, Joyce Curll, former Dean of Admissions at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law, and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets, says that explaining yourself and your background is vital to being considered for admission to law school. She also talks about the best way to present your explanation in a law school application-through an addendum. She discourages students from discussing a problem on their record in their personal statement. Finally, she goes on to say that having a positive attitude and being willing to disclose your situation fully can help with overcoming the “black” or “red” marks on your law school application.

Guests:

Susan Krinsky – Associate Dean of Admissions at Tulane University Law School
Joyce Curll – Former Dean of Admission at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets
Collins Byrd – Associate Dean of Admissions at University of Iowa College of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/black-marks-on-law-school-applications-2/feed/ 0 0:11:41 This week’s podcast discusses “black” or “red” marks on your law school applications. Our guests on the program are Susan Krinsky, Associate Dean of Admissions at Tulane University Law School; Joyce Curll, former Dean of Admissions at Harvard Law S[...] This week’s podcast discusses “black” or “red” marks on your law school applications. Our guests on the program are Susan Krinsky, Associate Dean of Admissions at Tulane University Law School; Joyce Curll, former Dean of Admissions at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law, and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets; and Collins Byrd, Assistant Dean of Admissions at University of Iowa College of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Should You Apply to Law School via Early Admission? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-apply-to-law-school-via-early-admission/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-apply-to-law-school-via-early-admission/#comments Mon, 25 Feb 2013 10:46:57 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2113 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the concept of early decision with law school applications. Some schools offer applicants the option to “apply early” to schools, which can be beneficial to students seeking entrance to a particular school. Early decision applicants often have an earlier deadline for their application, and will obtain their admissions decision sooner. This allows applicants to know far in advance if they have been admitted to the school of their choice. However, most early decisions are also binding, which require the student to attend the program they were admitted to, and to withdraw all applications with other schools.

On the program we have Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions; Sarah Zearfoss, Assistant Dean for Admissions at the University of Michigan Law School; and Al Watson, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at the University of Cincinnati College of Law.

Our first guest, Anna Ivey, says that when applying early decision, students should make sure that the school is their first choice. This is important because of the binding aspect most of the early decision agreement have in place. Ivey also reminds students that even though students are applying early, that doesn’t mean the application should be any different. An applicant should always complete the application to the best of his or her ability, and obey all school-imposed deadlines.

Sarah Zearfoss, Assistant Dean for Admissions at the University of Michigan Law School, says that although admissions chances are sometimes better for students applying early, uncompetitive numbers can still prove to be a hindrance for any candidacy. She also reiterates Ivey’s point that students choosing to apply early should make sure the school is their first choice, as they will often be bound to attend if accepted. Finally, she suggests that early applicants look into financial aid at the schools to which they are applying, because it could be different than it is for students applying for general admission.

Our final guest, Al Watson, says that early decision is a benefit for students who know where they want to attend. He cautions, however, that each student needs to decide what location, school, and academic program is best for him or her, and then decide if applying early decision is the best option.

Guests:

Anna Ivey - Author of Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions
Sarah Zearfoss – Assistant Dean of Admissions at the University of Michigan Law
Al Watson – Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid at the University of Cincinnati School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-apply-to-law-school-via-early-admission/feed/ 0 0:09:53 This week’s podcast discusses the concept of early decision with law school applications. Some schools offer applicants the option to “apply early” to schools, which can be beneficial to students seeking entrance to a particular school. Early decisi[...] This week’s podcast discusses the concept of early decision with law school applications. Some schools offer applicants the option to “apply early” to schools, which can be beneficial to students seeking entrance to a particular school. Early decision applicants often have an earlier deadline for their application, and will obtain their admissions decision sooner. This allows applicants to know far in advance if they have been admitted to the school of their choice. However, most early decisions are also binding, which require the student to attend the program they were admitted to, and to withdraw all applications with other schools. More... Law School Interactive no no
Non-Traditional Students Applying to Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/non-traditional-students-applying-to-law-school-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/non-traditional-students-applying-to-law-school-2/#comments Mon, 21 Jan 2013 09:06:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2092 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

The non-traditional law school student is the subject of this week’s podcast. Our guests will discuss what makes a student “non-traditional,” and will talk about what these students bring to the law school classroom.

Jannell Lundy Roberts talks about the diversity that non-traditional students bring to the conversation of the law school student body. Professors at Loyola, she says, often comment on how much they appreciate the real-world perspectives non-traditional students can bring to classroom discussions; because they often hail from multiple years in the work force, highly diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, or unusual life circumstances, non-traditional students can speak about how their past experiences relate to what they are studying, rather than simply extrapolating on concepts they have read in textbooks. Lundy Roberts also suggests that non-traditional students should visit law school campuses and meet with other non-traditional students before applying or matriculating, in order to fully understand the opportunities that each specific school can offer them.

Casey Ross-Petherick at the Oklahoma City University School of Law says that, when it comes to the application process, non-traditional students can (and should) definitely stand out. She says that reading about non-traditional students’ diversity (in ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, upbringing, or socioeconomic background) in applications allows admissions representatives to see students in a completely different light than traditional “straight-out-of-college” law school applicants. She emphasizes, however, that the non-traditional stories aren’t simply centered around a person’s identity or ethnic background. Non-traditional diversity can be achieved through various means-from working after college for many years or having different positive or negative life experiences, to overcoming adversity or having unusual life goals.

Our last guest is Pegah Parsi. Parsi is a non-traditional student on a variety of levels. She has served in the military during and after college, goes to school part-time so she can also maintain full-time employment while studying, and is going to school to obtain a joint JD/MBA degree. She says that choosing to attend law school years after college has allowed her to truly view the “bigger picture” of her schooling. She is able to enjoy her time in law school because she is not overwhelmed with the law school process, and can see it as a step-by-step path to a greater goal. Parsi also suggests that non-traditional students may have an edge during employment interviews because employers often value her dedication to education and her goal to become an attorney.

Guests:

Pegah Parsi – JD/MBA Student at the University of Maryland School of Law
Casey Ross-Petherick – Assistant Director of the Native American Legal Resource Center at the Oklahoma City University School of Law
Jannell Lundy Roberts – Assistant Dean of Admissions at Loyola Marymount University School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/non-traditional-students-applying-to-law-school-2/feed/ 0 0:12:00 The non-traditional law school student is the subject of this week’s podcast. Our guests will discuss what makes a student “non-traditional,” and will talk about what these students bring to the law school classroom. More... The non-traditional law school student is the subject of this week’s podcast. Our guests will discuss what makes a student “non-traditional,” and will talk about what these students bring to the law school classroom. More... Law School Interactive no no
The Successful Law School Interview https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-successful-law-school-interview-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-successful-law-school-interview-2/#comments Mon, 14 Jan 2013 13:18:58 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2089 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Our topic this week is the law school admissions interview. Though most law schools don’t require or request a formal interview as part of the admissions process, the ability to engage in a successful law school interview is an important skill for all law school applicants to master. It is important to remember that any interaction, formal or informal, you have with a representative from a law school can affect your admissions chances. Therefore, even if you find yourself meeting a law school representative at a relaxed social event, understanding the best interview techniques and how to apply them effectively is important. Being a successful law school interviewee can also ultimately aid you when interviewing for legal jobs or summer internships.

On today’s program we talk to Natalie Prescott, attorney and co-author of Nail Your Law Job Interview; Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions; and Cliff Ennico, co-author of The Legal Job Interview.

Anna Ivey, author and former Dean of Admissions at the University of Chicago Law School, encourages applicants to truly take the “practice makes perfect” adage to heart when it comes to law school interviews. She acknowledges that it can be awkward to speak into a camera or mirror as you practice, but states that knowing how you look and sound when speaking is important. She also provides insights on how a student can succeed in both a formal and informal interview setting.

Natalie Prescott, a practicing attorney and author, stresses the importance of seizing all opportunities to meet with admissions representatives. Being able to meet face-to-face with someone from the law schools you are applying to can be crucial for the success of the admissions process. She also mentions, however, that doing research on the person you will be meeting with and the institution they represent is essential. You should always know whom you are speaking with and pertinent information about their program.

Finally, Cliff Ennico says that interview skills are not only beneficial for conducting effective law school interviews, but also for summer internships and legal job interviews. He suggests that you should aim to portray a relaxed aura during your interview. He warns against talking too much or seeming overeager. He underlines that you want to appear to be a “no fuss” type of person, and should answer the questions as they come with ease and candor.

Guests:

Natalie Prescott – Attorney and Co-Author of Nail Your Law Job Interview
Anna Ivey – Author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions
Cliff Ennico – Author of The Legal Job Interview

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/the-successful-law-school-interview-2/feed/ 0 0:16:36 Our topic this week is the law school admissions interview. Though most law schools don't require or request a formal interview as part of the admissions process, the ability to engage in a successful law school interview is an important skill for a[...] Our topic this week is the law school admissions interview. Though most law schools don't require or request a formal interview as part of the admissions process, the ability to engage in a successful law school interview is an important skill for all law school applicants to master. It is important to remember that any interaction, formal or informal, you have with a representative from a law school can affect your admissions chances. Therefore, even if you find yourself meeting a law school representative at a relaxed social event, understanding the best interview techniques and how to apply them effectively is important. Being a successful law school interviewee can also ultimately aid you when interviewing for legal jobs or summer internships. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
Should I take the LSAT more than once? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-i-take-the-lsat-more-than-once-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-i-take-the-lsat-more-than-once-2/#comments Mon, 07 Jan 2013 13:16:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2083 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s program sheds light on the law school admission myth of taking the LSAT more than once. Many students believe that, if they take the LSAT more than once, law schools will average their LSAT scores, potentially putting them at a numerical disadvantage with single-LSAT applicants. However, many students are not aware of a 2006 American Bar Association policy requiring schools to only report the highest LSAT score for their admitted students. This ABA policy drastically changed the way many schools handle multiple LSAT scores, and allowed students greater flexibility when taking the test.

On the program we speak with Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs at Kaplan Test Prep & Admissions; Eva Lana, President of Binary Solution Test Preparation in New York City; and Jeffrey Zavrotny, Associate Director of Admissions at the University of Baltimore School of Law. All three of our guests discuss this misconception and provide students with options to succeed in the law school admission process.

Kaplan’s Jeff Thomas explains how the change in the ABA score-reporting policies can benefit students who have taken the test more than once. He also says, however, that different schools have different policies when it comes to interpreting multiple LSAT scores, and suggests that applicants contact the admissions office of the law schools they are interested in and inquire about their multiple-LSAT policy, in order to make an informed decision when they take the test.

Eva Lana of Binary Solution also has some advice for law school applicants. She suggests that students who don’t think they did as well as expected on the LSAT cancel their score. Lana says she believes this is the best option because students shouldn’t “air their dirty laundry” to law school admissions committees.

Finally, Jeffrey Zavrotny at the University of Baltimore School of Law says that he encourages his applicants to take the LSAT more than once. If an applicant has an “okay” LSAT score and only took the test once, Zavrotny says, he may think the applicant isn’t dedicated enough to try the test again and get a better score. However, Zavrotny also mentions that he and the Baltimore Law admissions committee do not have a standard policy on how multiple LSAT scores are perceived, and says the decision is normally done on a case-by-case basis.

Guests:

Jeff ThomasKaplan Test Prep & Admissions – Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs
Eva Lana – President – Binary Solution Test Preparation
Jeffrey ZavrotnyUniversity of Baltimore School of Law – Associate Director of Admissions

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-i-take-the-lsat-more-than-once-2/feed/ 0 0:09:34 This week’s program sheds light on the law school admission myth of taking the LSAT more than once. Many students believe that if they take the LSAT more than once, law schools will average their LSAT scores, potentially putting them at a numerical [...] This week’s program sheds light on the law school admission myth of taking the LSAT more than once. Many students believe that if they take the LSAT more than once, law schools will average their LSAT scores, potentially putting them at a numerical disadvantage with single-LSAT applicants. However, many students are not aware of a 2006 American Bar Association policy requiring schools to only report the highest LSAT score for their admitted students. This ABA policy drastically changed the way many schools handle multiple LSAT scores, and allowed students greater flexibility when taking the test. More... Law School Interactive no no
Law School – Beyond the Classroom https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom-2/#comments Mon, 31 Dec 2012 11:21:12 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2076 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast explores student life in law school. We discuss the need for and benefits of involvement in student organizations while attending law school.

Deans Laura Ferrari and Janet Stearns both emphasize that being involved in life outside of the classroom during law school is important. They discuss how participating in different organizations can offer many networking opportunities for students, as well as being the conduit to involvement in aspects of the law in which you may not be able to take a class. Student organizations, they state, allow you to add variety and spice to the set curriculum of your 1L year.

However, Dean Ferrari and Dean Stearns also believe that working hard to maintain a good balance between academic requirement and extracurricular involvement is important. Students, they say, should make sure they are not overwhelmed with their student organization commitments, and can still focus on their academics.

Our student guest is Kent Lloyd, a member of the Penn State Law Class of 2010 and the Vice Chair on the American Bar Association Student Law Division. He echoes the advice of Deans Ferrari and Stearns, but also offers advice to students interested in becoming involved in law school student organizations. He emphasizes the importance of not just signing up for organizations, but also reaching out to the current student leaders of each group and inquiring what would be required of 1L and 2L students who want to become involved. Student life, he suggests, can be a valuable addition to your law school career, when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations.

Guests:

Laura Ferrari – Dean of Students – Suffolk University Law School
Janet Stearns – Dean of Students – University of Miami Law School
Kent Lloyd – Vice Chair of the American Bar Association Student Law Division and Third-Year Law Student at Penn State’s Dickinson School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/law-school-beyond-the-classroom-2/feed/ 0 0:10:44 This week’s podcast explores the importance of being involved in student organizations while attending law school. Student life can be a valuable addition to your law school career when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations. M[...] This week’s podcast explores the importance of being involved in student organizations while attending law school. Student life can be a valuable addition to your law school career when it is carefully interwoven with your academic obligations. More... Law School Interactive no no
JD/MBA Joint Degree https://lawschoolinteractive.com/jdmba-joint-degree/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/jdmba-joint-degree/#comments Mon, 17 Dec 2012 12:23:27 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2073 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the joint JD/MBA degree. On the program we have Patrick Chung, a Harvard JD/MBA graduate and current partner at NEA (a venture capital firm in California); Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake Forest University School of Law; and Richard Hermann, co-editor of the Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs.

The JD/MBA degree is a staple at most law schools. This joint degree allows you to graduate with both law and business credentials after only four years of school, rather than the five years it would take to complete the programs separately. Although all JD/MBA programs provide the same outcome, different schools may have different requirements for their joint-degree applicants: Some may allow students to apply for a JD/MBA after completing the first year of law school or business school, while others require students to apply to the program before they begin their studies; some programs may require both LSAT and GMAT scores, while others require only one of the two standardized tests. Given these discrepancies, all of our guests suggest that you contact the JD/MBA programs you are interested in to obtain information regarding specific requirements.

Patrick Chung, a graduate of Harvard University’s JD/MBA program and partner in California venture capital firm NEA, says that combining the programs provided him with multiple advantages. By moving within both the law and business school circles, he was able to meet people in two completely different educational programs and build relationships that he wouldn’t otherwise have had the opportunity of creating. Although that extra year may seem like a long time, Chung states, being able to complete both degrees in just four years can be a very beneficial to your career prospects upon graduation. Even though his current position doesn’t often deal with the law specifically, having both degrees has allowed him to apply new ways of thinking in both the business and law worlds.

Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake Forest University School of Law, says that she has, in the many years since she began her admissions career, seen an increase in the popularity of the joint degree. She believes that the economy may be one of the driving forces behind its “hype.” Nutt states that having both degrees can offer greater career opportunities for students, and that it may be what students need in order to obtain their “dream job.” She also suggests that students who are trying to decide if the joint-degree path is right for them should speak with professionals in both the business and law fields.

Finally, Richard Hermann, co-editor of the Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs, agrees with Nutt and Chung by stating that the popularity of the JD/MBA degree isn’t only due to the variety obtained within the academic programs, but also to graduates’ increased likelihood of better employment opportunities. Hermann also discusses the different places joint-degree graduates can seek jobs with a JD/MBA degree. Law firms, corporations, federal and state governmental offices, and non-profit organizations, Hermann says, are just a few of the places graduates can successfully look for employment once their studies conclude.

Guests:

Patrick ChungHarvard JD/MBA Graduate
Melanie Nutt – Director of Admissions and Financial Aid – Wake Forest University School of Law
Richard Hermann – Co-Editor, Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/jdmba-joint-degree/feed/ 0 0:15:26 This week’s podcast discusses the joint JD/MBA degree. On the program we have Patrick Chung, a Harvard JD/MBA graduate and current partner at NEA (a venture capital firm in California); Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake[...] This week’s podcast discusses the joint JD/MBA degree. On the program we have Patrick Chung, a Harvard JD/MBA graduate and current partner at NEA (a venture capital firm in California); Melanie Nutt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Wake Forest University School of Law; and Richard Hermann, co-editor of the Directory of Law School Joint Degree Programs. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
How to Prepare for Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-prepare-for-law-school/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-prepare-for-law-school/#comments Mon, 10 Dec 2012 13:29:18 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2070 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast we take a look at preparing for law school. Many students wonder if they should do anything to ensure they are successful in law school, but don’t know where to start or what to do. Our experts talk about a variety of steps incoming law students can take to make sure they are prepared as they embark on their first year of law school.

Ursula Furi-Perry, Adjunct Professor at UMass Law and co-creator of PowerScore’s Law School Advantage course, talks about the importance of academic preparation, and discusses not only the new material but also the new ways of thinking law school will require you to learn. She also stresses that being personally ready to enter law school is important, and mentions the importance of being mentally ready for the workload and demands of a law school career.

Don Macaulay, President and Founder of Law Preview, tells us about the importance of doing well your first year of law school-not just because of your grades, but also because your first year performance is often tied into considering for Law Review and summer associate positions.

Our third guest is Gary Young, attorney and author of Law School Ninja. His book talks about “outsmarting” law school, and discusses the practical knowledge you will need to succeed as you go on this academic endeavor. He draws upon his personal law school experience and discusses the enormous amounts of reading and outlining required in law school (which can often take many hours of sitting and concentrating) and can prove to be difficult if you haven’t concentrated on that type of studying before. One of the most important steps you can take, he says, is making sure you understand the study skills and study habits required for law school.

Guests:

Ursula Furi-Perry – Director of Academic Support and Adjunct Professor at The Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
Don Macaulay – President and Founder – Law Preview
Gary Young – Attorney and Author of Law School Ninja

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-to-prepare-for-law-school/feed/ 0 0:12:56 What should you do to get ready for law school? In this week’s podcast, our experts talk about a variety of steps incoming law students can take to make sure they are prepared as they embark on their 1L year. More... What should you do to get ready for law school? In this week’s podcast, our experts talk about a variety of steps incoming law students can take to make sure they are prepared as they embark on their 1L year. More... Law School Interactive no no
Day in the Life of a Law Student https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-8/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-8/#comments Mon, 03 Dec 2012 13:15:24 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2067 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast places us in a unique vantage point as we hear first-hand stories from three different students currently in law school. We will talk with a married law student who took time off before attending law school, a transfer student, and even someone who finished their undergraduate degree in three years, and then went immediately on to law school.

This podcast gives us a look inside students’ lives as they embark on their journey through law school, and gives us a perspective of what other students can expect if they decide to reach for the same goal.

John Carroll talks about the process of being a transfer student and what it was like to attend first a small private school, and then a large public institution. Kevin Mills tell us what it was like to take time off before attending law school, and how he balances school with being a husband. From Kim Watson we hear her story of finishing undergrad in three years and now being on the fast-track to a law degree.

Guests:

Kevin Mills – Second Year – Stanford Law School
Kim Watson – First Year – University of Illinois College of Law
John Carroll – Second Year – Transferred to the University of South Carolina

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-8/feed/ 0 0:22:15 This week’s podcast places us in a unique vantage point as we hear first-hand stories from three different students currently in law school. We will talk with a married law student who took time off before attending law school, a transfer student, [...] This week’s podcast places us in a unique vantage point as we hear first-hand stories from three different students currently in law school. We will talk with a married law student who took time off before attending law school, a transfer student, and even someone who finished their undergraduate degree in three years, and then went immediately on to law school. More... Law School Interactive no no
What can I do with a law degree? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-law-degree/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-law-degree/#comments Mon, 26 Nov 2012 12:01:09 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2064 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What can I do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indiana School of Law; and Robert Nelson, Director of the American Bar Foundation.

Robert Boland came to us with a rather unique story. Although he was a passionate student athlete in college, worked in various athletics-related capacities, and did graduate work in sports broadcast management, he didn’t immediately go into sports agency after law school. Instead, he clerked, then served as an assistant district attorney, confidential assistant to a trial judge, and as a special counsel in antitrust litigation (the most common sports law issue) at two large New York law firms. It was only when he co-founded Global Athletic Management Enterprises (GAME) in 1998 that he began to build his sports clientele, and truly began a fruitful career in sports agency: endorsement and general athletic contract negotiation. He still works in the sports industry and serves as a full-time professor at NYU in the Masters of Sports Management program.

Our other two guests also shed light to other options available to students who graduate with a law degree.
Caroline Dowd Higgins talks about the advice she gives her students when they are just starting law school and are looking for a career path.

Robert Nelson talks about a study the American Bar Foundation did called After the JD and some of the surprising (and not-so-surprising) facts they discovered.

One of the most poignant (and most heartening) things you will learn from this podcast is that with a law degree you can–and many people do–follow your heart.

Guests:

Robert Boland – Professor, Sports Agent, Attorney – New York University
Caroline Dowd Higgins – Director of the Career and Professional Development Office – Indiana University
Robert Nelson – Director – American Bar Foundation

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/what-can-i-do-with-a-law-degree/feed/ 0 0:13:52 In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What can I do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Ind[...] In this week’s podcast we look into the question, “What can I do with a Law Degree?” We speak with Robert Boland, sports agent, attorney, and professor at NYU; Caroline Dowd Higgins, Director of the Career and Professional Development Office at Indiana School of Law; and Robert Nelson, Director of the American Bar Foundation. More... Law School Interactive no no
How Can I Pay for Law School? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-i-pay-for-law-school/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-i-pay-for-law-school/#comments Mon, 19 Nov 2012 12:36:57 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2061 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick (Director of Student Finance for the University of Connecticut Law School). Our experts comment on a variety of topics and ideas for students to consider when figuring out how to pay for law school.

Kim Clark says there are three things to consider when deciding about law school in general: Do you want to spend three years at law school? How are you going to pay for it? And, most importantly, what is going to happen once you graduate?

Joe Russo emphasizes the importance of remaining realistic with your chances of being admitted into law school and then paying off the loans you accrue when paying for it. His best piece of advice resonates of an old adage: If you don’t have to borrow, don’t borrow. He stresses that if you “live like a lawyer” (i.e., expensive housing, lavish meals, unnecessary expenditures) when you are a law student, you will live like a law student when you are a lawyer. He states that if students must borrow in order to live while in law school, they should do so sparingly and never over-borrow.

Finally, Roberta Frick goes over a variety of repayment plans that will benefit borrowers when they leave law school. She goes over loan forgiveness options and also discusses income based repayment plans (LRAPs) that allow borrowers to significantly reduce their monthly loan payments and have them be based on their income instead of their loan balance due.

Guests:

Kim Clark – Lead Education Writer – US News and World Report (Best Law Schools)
Joe Russo – Director of Student Financial Strategies – University of Notre Dame
Roberta Frick – Director of Student Finance – University of Connecticut Law School

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/how-can-i-pay-for-law-school/feed/ 0 0:15:26 This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick ([...] This week’s podcast gives information and advice on how to pay for law school. We hear from Kim Clark (lead education writer for the US News and World Report), Joe Russo (Director of Student Financial Strategies for Notre Dame), and Roberta Frick (Director of Student Finance for the University of Connecticut Law School). Our experts comment on a variety of topics and ideas for students to consider when figuring out how to pay for law school. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
Getting to Know the LSAT https://lawschoolinteractive.com/getting-to-know-the-lsat-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/getting-to-know-the-lsat-2/#comments Mon, 12 Nov 2012 12:54:41 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2058 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast covers the basics of the LSAT. We spoke with Linda Ashar, author of 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT; Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore; and Andrew Brody, Princeton Review’s National Content Director for LSAT Programs. In the program we take a look at some particulars of the test, including: when the exam is offered; the section break-down and timing of each section; and the content of the six sections (analytical reasoning, logical reasoning, reading comprehensive and an experimental section).

Listen to what the experts have to say about: the strategy of taking the test; not letting the experimental section hurt your performance on other sections; the misconceptions of the test (for example, it doesn’t test subject based knowledge); and the best ways to prepare for the LSAT.

This podcast will provide you with a working knowledge of the LSAT, helping you understand the basics of the test and giving you an idea of the best way to prepare for this important exam.

Guests:

Linda Ashar - Author - 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT
Jon Denning - Development Director - PowerScore
Andrew Brody - National Content Director for LSAT Programs - Princeton Review

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/getting-to-know-the-lsat-2/feed/ 0 0:07:22 This week’s podcast covers the basics of the LSAT. We spoke with Linda Ashar, author of 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT; Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore; and Andrew Brody, Princeton Review’s National Content Director for LSAT [...] This week’s podcast covers the basics of the LSAT. We spoke with Linda Ashar, author of 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT; Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore; and Andrew Brody, Princeton Review’s National Content Director for LSAT Programs. In the program we take a look at some particulars of the test, including: when the exam is offered; the section break-down and timing of each section; and the content of the six sections (analytical reasoning, logical reasoning, reading comprehensive and an experimental section). More... Law School Interactive no no
Is law school right for me? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-me-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-me-2/#comments Mon, 05 Nov 2012 12:49:07 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2050 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast helps answer the question “Is Law School Right For Me?” We spoke to Jose Ivan Roman, Assistant Director of Admissions at Boston Law School; Kelly Shull Cannon, Partner at Houser, Newman, Besley Law Firm; and Kris Tina Carlston, Lawyer and Pre-Law Advisor at Brigham Young University. Our experts discussed the qualities and skill sets it takes to succeed in the law school classroom and the questions to ask yourself before entering into the financial and time commitments of law school.

All three of our experts believe there are specific skill-sets needed to succeed in law school including drive and determination, plus analytical, writing, reading, and public speaking skills. In addition, there are many factors to consider before you make the decision to attend law school. Roman comments on the intellectual toughness of the program, Carlston mentions that a law degree doesn’t guarantee large salaries but could come with large debt, and Cannon speaks on the agility you must have to be a successful candidate.

If you still aren’t sure law school is the best option for you – this podcast will give you some great insight.

Guests:

Jose Ivan Roman - Assistant Director of Admissions - Boston College Law
Kelly Shull Cannon - Partner - Howser, Newman, Besley Law Firm
Kris Tina Carlston - Attorney and Pre-Law Advisor - Brigham Young University

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/is-law-school-right-for-me-2/feed/ 0 0:08:14 This week’s podcast helps answer the question “Is Law School Right For Me?”. We spoke to Jose Ivan Roman, Assistant Director of Admissions at Boston Law School; Kelly Shull Cannon, Partner at Houser, Newman, Besley Law Firm; and Kris Tina Carlston, [...] This week’s podcast helps answer the question “Is Law School Right For Me?”. We spoke to Jose Ivan Roman, Assistant Director of Admissions at Boston Law School; Kelly Shull Cannon, Partner at Houser, Newman, Besley Law Firm; and Kris Tina Carlston, Lawyer and Pre-Law Advisor at Brigham Young University. Our experts discussed the qualities and skill sets it takes to succeed in the law school classroom and the questions to ask yourself before entering into the financial and time commitments of law school. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
Federal Loan Forgiveness Programs https://lawschoolinteractive.com/federal-loan-forgiveness-programs-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/federal-loan-forgiveness-programs-2/#comments Mon, 29 Oct 2012 12:48:22 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2047 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses federal student loan forgiveness programs. We’ll hear from experts Isaac Bowers, Senior Program Manager for Educational Debt & Outreach at Equal Justice Works; Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of finaid.org and fastweb.com; and Heather Jarvis, financial expert at askheatherjarvis.com.

Isaac Bowers begins his comments by explaining the variety of federal loan forgiveness programs available to students after graduating law school, but emphasizes that you must have federal loans to be eligible for these types of forgiveness programs—private loans are not eligible. In addition, he suggests that, although these forgiveness programs exist and can make the debt load of law school manageable, students should first focus on maximizing the amount of grants and scholarships they receive—their goal should be to borrow as little as possible. Bower finishes his comments by reminding students that law school is a considerable financial commitment and that prospective law school applicants should ensure that law is professional field they would like to pursue before signing on the dotted line.

Our second guest, Mark Kantrowitz, discusses various loan forgiveness programs available to students, and talks about the difference between “front end” (i.e., get money during law school) and “back end” (i.e., get repayment assistance after law school) programs. Kantrowitz specifically mentions the public service loan forgiveness program as one that can be very beneficial for future attorneys interested in public defense work.

Our final guest, Heather Jarvis, agrees with our first two guests and reiterates that federal loan forgiveness programs can be incredibly beneficial for many people. She also mentions that these programs are, for the most part, only for federal loans, and so encourages students to ensure that all of their student loans are federal, as private loans will not be taken into consideration. In closing, Jarvis reminds students that these programs are not automatic—there is a lot of paperwork to be filed and details to be considered in order to take advantage of these programs, so students should make sure to start early and complete all required paperwork well ahead of program deadlines.

Guests:

Isaac Bowers – Senior Program Manager at Equal Justice Works
Mark Kantrowitz – Publisher of FinAid.org and Fastweb.com
Heather Jarvis – Financial Expert with Ask Heather Jarvis

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/federal-loan-forgiveness-programs-2/feed/ 0 0:22:02 This week's podcast discusses federal student loan forgiveness programs. We'll hear from experts Isaac Bowers, Senior Program Manager for Educational Debt & Outreach at Equal Justice Works; Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of finaid.org and fastweb.c[...] This week's podcast discusses federal student loan forgiveness programs. We'll hear from experts Isaac Bowers, Senior Program Manager for Educational Debt & Outreach at Equal Justice Works; Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of finaid.org and fastweb.com; and Heather Jarvis, financial expert at askheatherjarvis.com. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
Choosing a Law School–Scholarship vs. Highly Ranked https://lawschoolinteractive.com/choosing-a-law-school-scholarship-vs-highly-ranked/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/choosing-a-law-school-scholarship-vs-highly-ranked/#comments Mon, 22 Oct 2012 14:21:07 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2042 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the differences between choosing a law school due to scholarship monies or a high ranking. Our guests on the program are Anne Chaconas, Director of Admission Counseling at PowerScore Test Preparation; Deborah Schneider, co-author of Should You Really Be a Lawyer; Ian Graham, attorney and author of Unbillable Hours; and Gary Young, attorney and author of Law School Ninja.

Our experts today discuss deciding between a law school for scholarship purposes or due to its U.S. News and World Report rank.

Our first guest, Anne Chaconas, Director of Admission Counseling at PowerScore, says students should evaluate many things when choosing a law school (everything from the current economic status to their intended field of work), and suggests that looking at the big picture and not getting too hung up on one specific factor is important. Chaconas also suggests that, while rankings should play a part in the decision-making process, they shouldn’t be the only or deciding factor.

Deborah Schneider, author of Should You Really Be a Lawyer, says that asking yourself what aspects of law school are most important to you can help with your decision between scholarship and rankings. She suggests that your career goals can be an indication of what law school is best for you, and believes that starting the law school application and research process early can help when it comes time to decide which options are best for you.

Ian Graham, attorney and author of Unbillable Hours, says that, although choosing a law school can be stressful, you must look at it as an investment. He also suggests that where you attend law school will have a direct affect on where you are able to obtain employment, and echoes Chaconas’ sentiment that considering your intended field of work is an essential part of the process.

Our final guest, Gary Young, attorney and author of Law School Ninja, thoroughly agrees with our other guests and strongly encourages students to make their law school choice based on the job they ultimately hope to have.

Guests:

Anne Chaconas – Director of Admission Counseling at PowerScore Test Preparation and author of the upcoming book, The PowerScore Guide to the Top U.S. Law Schools
Deborah Schneider – Co-author of Should You Really Be a Lawyer
Ian Graham – Attorney and author of Unbillable Hours
Gary Young – Attorney and author of Law School Ninja

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/choosing-a-law-school-scholarship-vs-highly-ranked/feed/ 0 0:25:00 This week's podcast discusses the differences between choosing a law school due to scholarship monies or a high ranking. Our guests on the program are Anne Chaconas, Director of Admission Counseling at PowerScore Test Preparation; Deborah Schneider,[...] This week's podcast discusses the differences between choosing a law school due to scholarship monies or a high ranking. Our guests on the program are Anne Chaconas, Director of Admission Counseling at PowerScore Test Preparation; Deborah Schneider, co-author of Should You Really Be a Lawyer; Ian Graham, attorney and author of Unbillable Hours; and Gary Young, attorney and author of Law School Ninja. More... Law School Interactive no no
ABA vs. Non-ABA Accredited Law Schools https://lawschoolinteractive.com/aba-vs-non-aba-accredited-law-schools/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/aba-vs-non-aba-accredited-law-schools/#comments Mon, 15 Oct 2012 13:31:14 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2032 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses deciding between an ABA-accredited and a non-ABA-accredited law school. On the program we have Richard Hermann, professor at Concord Law School, a non-ABA-accredited online law school; Hulett H. “Bucky” Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association (ABA); and George Leal, the Director of Educational Standards in the Office of Admissions at the State Bar of California.

Potential law school students have hundreds of law schools to choose from. An important aspect of this choice is whether or not the school is accredited, and which accreditation it holds. Our guests will discuss the different accreditations that are available, and what students should consider before choosing a law school.

Our first guest, Hulett “Bucky” Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association, discusses the ABA’s standards the ABA requires law school to achieve before bestowing accreditation. He also talks about how important it is for students to consider where they want to practice so that they can make sure to attend a law school that complies with that state’s bar requirements. Askew advises students to thoroughly research law schools before attending so they know exactly what to expect.

On today’s program we will also discuss another large accreditation program, the State Bar of California. George Leal, the Director of Educational Standards in the Office of Admissions at the State Bar of California, discusses their accreditation process and how non-ABA-accredited law schools in California can earn accreditation from his organization. In addition to detailing his organization’s accreditation process, Leal also discusses the difference between the ABA’s and the State Bar of California’s requirements for accreditation.

Our final guest, Richard Hermann, professor at Concord Law School (a non-ABA-accredited online law school), says that students have many reasons to choose a specific law school and states that the ability to sit for any state’s bar examination may end up being a deciding factor in favor of an ABA-accredited law program. He also discusses how non-ABA accredited law schools can be good choice for the right student.

Guests:

Hulett H. “Bucky” AskewConsultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association
George Leal – Director of Educational Standards in the Office of Admissions at the State Bar of California
Richard Hermann – Professor at Concord Law School

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/aba-vs-non-aba-accredited-law-schools/feed/ 0 0:22:44 This week's podcast discusses deciding between an ABA-accredited and a non-ABA-accredited law school. On the program we have Richard Hermann, professor at Concord Law School, a non-ABA-accredited online law school; Hulett H. "Bucky" Askew, Consulta[...] This week's podcast discusses deciding between an ABA-accredited and a non-ABA-accredited law school. On the program we have Richard Hermann, professor at Concord Law School, a non-ABA-accredited online law school; Hulett H. "Bucky" Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association (ABA); and George Leal, the Director of Educational Standards in the Office of Admissions at the State Bar of California. More... Law School Interactive no no
University of Colorado Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/university-of-colorado-law-school-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/university-of-colorado-law-school-2/#comments Mon, 08 Oct 2012 12:00:09 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2023 More...

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University of Colorado Law School

Today’s featured law school is the University of Colorado at Boulder Law School. During the program you will hear from the Dean of the law school, David Getches, and JD dual-degree student, Gabriella Sockmeyer.

The U.S. News & World Report ranks Colorado Law 47th in its most recent law school rankings. The school currently has a full-time enrollment of 551 students. Tuition for 2012-2013 in-state students is around $31,000 and a little over $38,000 for out-of-state students. Of the 176 graduates in the Colorado Law class of 2011, 160 (91 percent) reported employment nine months after graduation.

For the incoming class of 2014, Colorado Law received 3,175 applications requesting admission and 30% were admitted. The median LSAT score was 164 and the median GPA was 3.64.

Dean Getches says there are three things that make his law school stand out among its peers: A commitment to public service, a green campus environment, and the school’s focus on experiential learning. He suggests that, if you are interested in attending Colorado Law, you take some time to read over the faculty résumés on the school’s website; he believes it is important for students and faculty to compliment each other, particularly given the intense nature of the law school experience. Dean Getches also encourages potential applicants to reach out to current Colorado Law students and faculty in order to get a first-hand account of what the Colorado Law experience is truly like.

Our Colorado Law student perspective comes from Gabriella Sockmeyer. Sockmeyer asserts that Colorado Law was everything she wanted in a program and believes it could be that way for other students. She goes on to praise the school’s well-balanced student body, and emphasizes the great mix of opportunities offered at Colorado Law.

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/university-of-colorado-law-school-2/feed/ 0 0:11:50 Today's featured law school is the University of Colorado at Boulder Law School. During the program you will hear from the Dean of the law school, David Getches, and JD dual-degree student, Gabriella Sockmeyer. More... Today's featured law school is the University of Colorado at Boulder Law School. During the program you will hear from the Dean of the law school, David Getches, and JD dual-degree student, Gabriella Sockmeyer. More... Law School Interactive no no
Day in the Life of a Law Student https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-7/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-7/#comments Mon, 01 Oct 2012 12:47:58 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2020 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast features three law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school.

The students featured in this program are Jason Tenenbaum, a 3L at Hofstra Law School; Stephanie Green, a student at at Arizona State University; and Brooke Scalf, who attends Faulkner University, Jones School of Law.

All our featured students have very different experiences and reasons they wanted to become lawyers.

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/day-in-the-life-of-a-law-student-7/feed/ 0 0:16:58 This week's podcast features three law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school. The students featured in this program are Jason Tenenbaum, a 3L at Hofstra Law School; Stephanie Green,[...] This week's podcast features three law school students. During the program you will hear about their experiences before and during law school. The students featured in this program are Jason Tenenbaum, a 3L at Hofstra Law School; Stephanie Green, a student at Arizona State University; and Brooke Scalf, who attends Faulkner University, Jones School of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Letters of Recommendation https://lawschoolinteractive.com/letters-of-recommendation-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/letters-of-recommendation-3/#comments Mon, 24 Sep 2012 12:00:43 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2016 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses letters of recommendation in the law school application. The letter of recommendation can be a telling aspect of any application because it can show the relationship between an applicant and a third party. It gives an applicant’s mentor, professor or friend the ability to explain to an admissions representative why they might be a better candidate than other similarly-situated applicants.

On the program we have Heike Spahn, Senior Consultant with admissions consulting company AdmissionsConsultants, Inc., and former Assistant Dean at University of Chicago Law School; Joyce Curll, former Dean of Admission at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets; and Susan Whalley, author of How to Write Powerful Letters of Recommendation and founder of CheckMyCollegeApp.com.

Our first guest, Heike Spahn, says that letters of recommendation are extremely important but won’t compensate for other parts of the application such as a low LSAT score or GPA. She believes that it is very important to make sure the right person is writing the letter of recommendation, and says it needs to be someone who knows you well and is able to speak knowledgeable about your academic ability and character. Spahn suggests that older applicants who have been out of school for a number of years and are unable to receive a stellar recommendation from a former professor ask a mentor or supervisor at their place of business.

Joyce Curll agrees with Spahns comments, and says that letters of recommendation should definitely come from someone who knows you well. Although many students believe that a recommender’s impressive title will take them far, Curll suggests that prominent figures in the community, though they may seem prestigious, aren’t always the best choice. It is better to obtain a recommendation from someone less well-known who can attest to your work ethic.

Our final guest, Susan Whalley, talks about the best type of letter an applicant can receive. She then goes on to say that building relationships with your professors and other academia personnel can be critical if you are interested in going to a graduate or professional program. Whalley also says it is imperative that the applicant give their recommender all the information they can about themselves so the writer can pen the best letter possible. Finally, she suggests that following up with the writers is important, and an essential part of the process.

Guests:

Heike Spahn – Senior Consultant with AdmissionsConsultants, Inc. and former Assistant Dean at University of Chicago Law School
Joyce Curll – Former Dean of Admission at Harvard Law School and New York University School of Law and author of Best Law School Admission Secrets
Susan Whalley - Author of How to Write Powerful Letters of Recommendation and founder of CheckMyCollegeApp.com

Free LSAT and Law School Admissions Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/letters-of-recommendation-3/feed/ 0 0:19:28 This week’s podcast discusses letters of recommendation in the law school application. The letter of recommendation can be a telling aspect of any application because it can show the relationship between an applicant and a third party. It gives an [...] This week’s podcast discusses letters of recommendation in the law school application. The letter of recommendation can be a telling aspect of any application because it can show the relationship between an applicant and a third party. It gives an applicant’s mentor, professor or friend the ability to explain to an admissions representative why they might be a better candidate than other similarly-situated applicants. More... Law School Interactive no no
Branding Yourself On Law School Applications https://lawschoolinteractive.com/branding-yourself-on-law-school-applications-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/branding-yourself-on-law-school-applications-2/#comments Mon, 17 Sep 2012 12:00:14 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2012 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses effectively marketing and branding yourself on law school applications. We’ll hear from experts Edward Tom, Dean of Admission at UC Berkeley School of Law and Bill Hoye, Associate Dean of Admission and Student Affairs at Duke University School of Law.

Dean Edward Tom underscores the importance of students thinking about and clearly articulating the voice they are going to bring into the classroom on their law school application. In this way, he says, students are giving admission staffers a good idea of what type of student you will be in the classroom. He advises students against writing about what they think he “wants to hear,” but rather focusing on what they want to say. Dean Tom goes on to say that practicing law should be a calling—therefore, explaining your motivations for practicing law can sometimes make an application stand out. He also posits that individual motivations are the most powerful reasons behind an applicant’s law school bid, and should flow into an applicant’s personal branding scheme in both the application and the personal statement.

Dean Bill Hoye, on the other hand, feels that trying to “brand” yourself on law school applications can be perceived as artificial. When an application is overly branded, he says, it can sometimes feel like the student is only saying what they feel is necessary to be accepted. Instead of having a comprehensive marketing scheme for their applications, Dean Hoye recommends that students simply write from their heart and focus on personal experiences. In closing, Dean Hoye suggests that all students completing law school applications do so with unwavering confidence.

Guests:

Edward Tom – Dean of Admissions at UC Berkeley School of Law
Bill Hoye – Associate Dean of Admission and Student Affairs at Duke University School of Law

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/branding-yourself-on-law-school-applications-2/feed/ 0 0:13:14 This week's podcast discusses effectively marketing and branding yourself on law school applications. We'll hear from experts Edward Tom, Dean of Admission at UC Berkeley School of Law and Bill Hoye, Associate Dean of Admission and Student Affairs a[...] This week's podcast discusses effectively marketing and branding yourself on law school applications. We'll hear from experts Edward Tom, Dean of Admission at UC Berkeley School of Law and Bill Hoye, Associate Dean of Admission and Student Affairs at Duke University School of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Working While In Law School https://lawschoolinteractive.com/working-while-in-law-school-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/working-while-in-law-school-2/#comments Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:00:20 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2009 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses working while in law school. On the program we have Hulett H. “Bucky” Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association; Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP, a law firm in Miami, Florida; and Susanne Aronowitz, Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law.

The American Bar Association has set rules for full-time law school students and their ability to hold full-time or part-time jobs. According to the ABA, “a student may not be employed more than 20 hours per week in any week in which the student is enrolled in more than twelve class hours.” A student who needs or wishes to work more than the ABA’s allotted twenty hours may need to reconsider their options before attending law school on a full-time basis. Today’s guests offer advice and suggestions on how to earn some extra money and experience while still being a law school student.

Our first guest, Bucky Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association, discusses the ABA rule on working no more than 20 hours per week and talks about why the policy was instituted. He says that the rule is enforced so students are able to spend the majority of their time on being a law school student, and working on the start of their legal career.

Susanne Aronowitz, Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law, believes that the ABA employment rule is in place so students don’t develop too many distractions outside of class and school, and can focus more effectively on succeeding in law school. However, she suggests that students get involved with “employment-like” activities within school, such as clinics or pro bono work. This will help them build their résumé and receive legal experience. She also adds that if a student needs a job to help pay bills or stay financially stable, they should work with their school’s Career Services Office for advice and guidance.

Our final guest, Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP in Miami (FL), is also responsible for the professional development of associates at his firm. He believes that not taking full-time employment while in law school is a common sense decision. Because law school isn’t an easy academic program, students need all their time and focus to succeed. He also explains that getting experience in law school is important and building a balance of work and school is critical, however, and stresses the importance of finding venues in which to obtain legal and client experience while in law school.

Guests:

Hulett H. “Bucky” Askew - Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association

Brad Kaufman - Attorney and Shareholder at Greenburg Traurig, LLP 
Susanne Aronowitz - Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/working-while-in-law-school-2/feed/ 0 0:13:50 This week's podcast discusses working while in law school. On the program we have Hulett H. "Bucky" Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association; Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP, a law firm in [...] This week's podcast discusses working while in law school. On the program we have Hulett H. "Bucky" Askew, Consultant on Legal Education to the American Bar Association; Brad Kaufman, attorney and shareholder at Greenburg Traurig LLP, a law firm in Miami, Florida; and Susanne Aronowitz, Associate Dean for Law Career Services and Alumni Relations at Golden Gate University School of Law. More... Law School Interactive no no
Contract Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/contract-law-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/contract-law-2/#comments Mon, 03 Sep 2012 12:04:31 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2006 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the legal practice of contracts. We’ll hear from experts Frank Snyder, Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Steven Schooner, Professor at George Washington University Law School; and Brian Bix, Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School.

Frank Snyder starts his comments by defining contract law and explaining it as an unusual part of the legal system, and speaks of its practical aspects and the importance of being attuned to the client’s needs. Professor Snyder finishes his comments by likening the practice of contract law with business advising, and mentions that those who are good business adviser will likely enjoy and do well with contract law. He also advises students to investigate all areas of legal practice that they are interested in to find the one they would like to specialize in.

Steven Schooner explains that contract law is a very different law practice than the more common practice areas of criminal, tort, or defense law. He underscores the fact that there seems to be no gray areas when it comes to students and contract law: Students either consider the field fascinating, they don’t. He says that if you find business and bargains interesting, contract law might be the practice for you—and a love of math and numbers helps, too.

Our final guest, Brian Bix, talks about contract law’s connection with many other specialties. Although undergraduate courses will not teach you much about the intricacies of contract law, Professor Bix tells budding law school student not to worry—law school will definitely give you the tools you need to succeed in the field. He ends his advice by saying that to be successful in this practice of law, face-to-face interaction and conversational skill is definitely a necessity.

Guests:

Frank Snyder – Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law
Brian Bix – Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School
Steven Schooner – Professor at George Washington University Law School

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/contract-law-2/feed/ 0 0:19:06 This week's podcast takes a look at the legal practice of contracts. We'll hear from experts Frank Snyder, Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Steven Schooner, Professor at George Washington University Law School; and Brian Bix, Professor at [...] This week's podcast takes a look at the legal practice of contracts. We'll hear from experts Frank Snyder, Professor at Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Steven Schooner, Professor at George Washington University Law School; and Brian Bix, Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Journals and Clinics https://lawschoolinteractive.com/journals-and-clinics-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/journals-and-clinics-2/#comments Mon, 27 Aug 2012 12:00:49 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2003 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses law journals. All law schools have opportunities for students to work on and contribute to a number of student-edited publications. The one usually considered most “prestigious” is the law school’s Law Review (which typically has scholarly pieces discussing legal issues written by professors and legal experts), although there are also a variety of other journals students can join, dealing with specific areas of the law (i.e., sports law, business law, international law). No matter the type of journal you choose, though, taking part in one can definitely help you during and after law school.

Our first guest, Cliff Ennico, is the author of the book Make Law Review. He says that being part of Law Review gives students insight to and training for the hard work that is still ahead in law school, and also as a new law associate. Although Ennico warms that you will likely spend more time with your fellow journal editors than your best friend, he says the experience is absolutely worth it. He also gives tips from his book on writing a case comment and explains how these skills can help either in your attempt to become part of a law journal or succeed in your current journal endeavors.

One of the two law review editors we spoke with for the podcast, Farhang Heydari, is editor-in-chief for the Columbia Law Review. Heydari believes that it is important for students to be part of any journal (not just the Law Review) because it allows them to develop a great set of skills through journal work that they don’t normally pick up in the classroom. He also says the responsibilities you are given as a journal staff member is a definitely a unique aspect of being in law school that students should embrace.

Finally, our third guest is Omar Ochoa, editor-in-chief of the Texas Law Review at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law. Ochoa says that one of the great aspects of being part of any journal is that it will introduce you to students you may not have met otherwise, which will in turn give you great networking skills and the ability to call upon them when you enter the legal field. Ochoa also says one of the biggest benefits of being part of a journal is being able to sharpen your writing skills, which is a great ability to have when you enter the legal sphere, and believes that being part of a journal can give you an edge when applying for law jobs or judicial clerkships.

Guests:

Cliff Ennico – Author of Make Law Review
Farhang Heydari – Editor-in-Chief of Columbia Law School Law Review
Omar Ochoa – Editor-in-Chief of Texas Law Review at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/journals-and-clinics-2/feed/ 0 0:14:00 This week's podcast discusses law journals. All law schools have opportunities for students to work on and contribute to a number of student-edited publications. The one usually considered most "prestigious" is the law school's Law Review (which typ[...] This week's podcast discusses law journals. All law schools have opportunities for students to work on and contribute to a number of student-edited publications. The one usually considered most "prestigious" is the law school's Law Review (which typically has scholarly pieces discussing legal issues written by professors and legal experts), although there are also a variety of other journals students can join, dealing with specific areas of the law (i.e., sports law, business law, international law). No matter the type of journal you choose, though, taking part in one can definitely help you during and after law school. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
LSAT Experimental Section https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-experimental-section-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-experimental-section-2/#comments Mon, 20 Aug 2012 12:00:19 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1993 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the experimental section of the LSAT. We’ll hear from Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review.

Jeff Thomas tells us that the experimental section of the LSAT is an unscored portion of the test that is used by the makers of the test, the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), to develop upcoming LSAT tests. LSAT-takers are not informed which of the five sections in their test is the unscored experimental ones. Thomas says that students don’t need to prepare for this section specifically since it is similar to the other sections on the test; the experimental section will cover the same concepts that the other four sections of the test do.

Andrew Brody begins by saying that the experimental section will look very similar to the other parts of the test. He agrees with Thomas and says there is no way to specifically prepare for the experimental section other than preparing for the test as a whole. Brody warns students against trying to “guess” which section might be the experimental one, in hopes of not having to work as hard on it. Instead, he suggests that students treat all sections as if they are scored, in order to do as well as possible on the exam.

Guests:

Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Andrew Brody – National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/lsat-experimental-section-2/feed/ 0 0:10:55 This week's podcast discusses the experimental section of the LSAT. We'll hear from Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princet[...] This week's podcast discusses the experimental section of the LSAT. We'll hear from Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review. More... Law School Interactive no no
FASFA https://lawschoolinteractive.com/fasfa-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/fasfa-2/#comments Mon, 20 Aug 2012 11:30:49 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1989 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FASFA. We’ll hear from experts Kathleen Koch, Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law; Nicky Fornarotto, Financial Aid Coordinator and LRAP Administrator at Rutgers School of Law–Newark; and Dr. Jeffrey Hanson, owner of Jeffrey Hanson Education Services.

Kathleen Koch begins by explaining the FASFA as a federal form that students fill out to present and organize their complete financial profile for educational institutions. She explains that students must gather their most recent tax returns, W-2 forms, pay stubs, and school codes for any program they are interested in applying to, in order to prepare to complete the FAFSA. Koch also talks about the Student Aid Report (SAR) form that is generated after students complete the FAFSA, and explains that it the summary of the information provided in the latter. She warns that filling out the form truthfully and completely is a must—30% of the applicant pool at Seattle University School of Law, for example, is randomly requested to give more information for verification. Koch’s final advice to students filling out the FASFA is to take their time and complete the form without rushing.

Our second guest, Nicky Fornarotto, begins her comments by answering the frequently asked question, “Do students have to include their parents information on the FASFA form?” Although her answer to this is no, she says that some schools do ask for parental information so students should be prepared to provide it. In addition to the information already mentioned by Kock, Fornarotto also suggests that students know and be ready to provide the balance of their bank account(s). Fornarotto also advises students not to include their home value or current held student loan monies in their asset calculations.

Jeffrey Hanson agrees with Kathleen Koch, and emphasizes that students should have their tax returns readily available when filling out the FASFA. He also mentions that students will receive their SAR (Student Aid Report) after completing the FAFSA, and should receive their financial aid package notifications from the schools they have applied to shortly after. After receiving these notifications, students can then decide which financial aid package is best for them.

Guests:

Kathleen Koch – Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law
Dr. Jeffrey Hanson – Owner of Jeffrey Hanson Education Services
Nicky Fornarotto – Financial Aid Coordinator and LRAP Administrator at Rutgers School of Law–Newark

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/fasfa-2/feed/ 0 0:13:46 This week's podcast discusses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FASFA. We'll hear from experts Kathleen Koch, Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law; Nicky Fornarotto, Financial Aid Coordinat[...] This week's podcast discusses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FASFA. We'll hear from experts Kathleen Koch, Assistant Dean for Student Financial Services at Seattle University School of Law; Nicky Fornarotto, Financial Aid Coordinator and LRAP Administrator at Rutgers School of Law–Newark; and Dr. Jeffrey Hanson, owner of Jeffrey Hanson Education Services. More... Uncategorized Law School Interactive no no
Mergers and Acquisitions https://lawschoolinteractive.com/mergers-and-acquisitions-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/mergers-and-acquisitions-2/#comments Mon, 06 Aug 2012 13:30:47 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1986 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the legal practice of mergers and acquisitions. We’ll hear from experts Felix Kushnir, attorney at Dickstein Sharpiro LLP in Washington (DC), and Bill Staley, an attorney in California.

Felix Kushnir explains that the practice of mergers and acquisitions focuses on business transactions and mergers. He emphasizes that, at the most basic level, students need to understand corporate transactions in order to be successful at M&A, and mentions that even something as simple as reading the Wall Street Journal can help increase your understanding of the practice. Kushnir also says that students should have an interest in solving puzzles, a trait that will be very useful in the practice. He finishes his comments by saying that those interested in pursuing an M&A practice should be ready for extended periods of demanding and consuming work. The time commitment the practice demands, he says, can be extensive and unpredictable—the job, however, can be also very rewarding.

Bill Staley begins by explaining that his practice mostly deals with tax planning for business transactions. He suggests that students interested in eventually practicing M&A law should consider taking business classes as part of their undergraduate curriculum, and corporate law classes in law school. Staley also emphasized the profession’s need for detail-oriented attorneys, and talks about how the skills needed in M&A are very similar to those that allow investment bankers to succeed—students often gravitate between the two professions. He encourages students to really think about what will be required of them as an M&A attorney before committing to the career, in order to ensure that they will both enjoy it and be successful at it.

Guests:

Felix Kushnir – Attorney at Dickstein Shapiro LLP
Bill Staley – Principal at the Law Office of William C. Staley

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/mergers-and-acquisitions-2/feed/ 0 0:08:48 This week's podcast takes a look at the legal practice of mergers and acquisitions. We'll hear from experts Felix Kushnir, attorney at Dickstein Sharpiro LLP in Washington (DC), and Bill Staley, an attorney in California. More... This week's podcast takes a look at the legal practice of mergers and acquisitions. We'll hear from experts Felix Kushnir, attorney at Dickstein Sharpiro LLP in Washington (DC), and Bill Staley, an attorney in California. More... Law School Interactive no no
Should You Take an Online LSAT Course? https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-an-online-lsat-course/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-an-online-lsat-course/#comments Sun, 29 Jul 2012 08:12:59 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=2183 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

Sponsored by PowerScore Test Preparation

The week’s podcast takes a look at LSAT online preparation courses. On the program are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore Test Preparation.

Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, starts by stating that today’s students require the availability of many different types of preparation for the LSAT. He goes on to say that determining if online LSAT prep courses are the right learning environment for the student is a crucial first step that students must complete before enrolling in an online prep course. Thomas also emphasizes that, although online courses are often more readily available than traditional classroom courses, and often offer greater flexibility, this does not mean that online courses offer less preparation or materials than other types of LSAT preparation.

Jon Denning, Development Director at PowerScore Test Preparation, says that the primary benefit of LSAT online preparation courses is their accessibility. He also says he doesn’t believe there are any true negatives to online courses, but that students must understand the need to be self-disciplined if they choose to take part in this kind of preparation. Denning goes onto say that success in an online preparation course isn’t limited to just one type of student, and that it can be beneficial to those in all different professions and at different points in their LSAT studies. He also mentions that an added benefit of these classes is that students from all over the world can take part in the preparation, and add to the discussion in the virtual classroom. Finally, Denning agrees with Thomas and says that online courses not only allow students to learn the same information as other courses from their location of choice, they also often the same amount and quality of preparation material.

Guests:

Jeff Thomas – Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Jon Denning – Development Director at PowerScore Test Preparation

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/should-you-take-an-online-lsat-course/feed/ 0 0:13:27 The week's podcast takes a look at LSAT online preparation courses. On the program are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore Test Preparation. [...] The week's podcast takes a look at LSAT online preparation courses. On the program are Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, and Jon Denning, Development Director for PowerScore Test Preparation. More... Law School Interactive no no
Choosing the Best Mix of Law Schools https://lawschoolinteractive.com/choosing-the-best-mix-of-law-schools-2/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/choosing-the-best-mix-of-law-schools-2/#comments Mon, 23 Jul 2012 01:40:33 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1978 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the best mix of law schools for applications to which students should apply. We’ll hear from experts Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions, and Heike Spahn, senior law school admissions consultant with AdmissionConsultants, Inc. Both Ivey and Spahn have held the post of Associate Director of Admissions at the University of Chicago Law School.

Heike Spahn begins by talking about the importance of selecting a law school based on where the student sees him or herself practicing after graduation, and discusses the importance of not just researching programs and professors, but geography, too. She tells students that, while it is important to have a wide variety of schools on their list, it is also advisable to only apply to schools at which their numbers fall at or above the median. Spahn concludes by mentioning that, in addition to geography and numbers, students should also consider the course offerings at each school, and try to apply to those schools that have an attractive academic profile.

Anna Ivey begins by stating that selecting a law school is very different from choosing an undergraduate institution, particularly because a J.D. isn’t required for most types of employment. Ivey agrees with Spahn, and states that geography is an important aspect when choosing a law school to apply to. In closing, Ivey says that a student’s final law school application list should have around ten schools, although she does say that there is nothing wrong with applying to only 2-5 schools if the student’s requirements are very specific..

Guests:

Anna Ivey – Author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions
Heike Spahn – Senior law school admissions consultant with AdmissionConsultants, Inc.

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LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/choosing-the-best-mix-of-law-schools-2/feed/ 0 0:16:57 This week's podcast discusses the factors to consider when choosing a mix of law schools. We'll hear from experts Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions, and Heike Spahn, senior law school admissions consultant with AdmissionCo[...] This week's podcast discusses the factors to consider when choosing a mix of law schools. We'll hear from experts Anna Ivey, author of The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions, and Heike Spahn, senior law school admissions consultant with AdmissionConsultants, Inc. More... Law School Interactive no no
Public Interest Scholarship Programs https://lawschoolinteractive.com/public-interest-scholarship-programs-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/public-interest-scholarship-programs-3/#comments Mon, 16 Jul 2012 12:00:46 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1976 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at public interest scholarship programs. We’ll hear from experts Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com; Beth Hansen, Director of Career Services at BYU Law School; and Elizabeth Dunn, Director of Public Service Careers and Pro Bono programs at Villanova Law School.

Heather Jarvis tells us that some law schools, such as BYU and Villanova, have dedicated public interest scholarship programs, although they often vary in scope and nature. She suggests that those students interested in pursuing their public interest goals during law school take a look at clinical opportunities and public service student organizations.

Beth Hansen talks about the public service scholarship program at BYU Law School, describing it as one that seeks to “bridge the gap” for students in public service careers. She also tells us about BYU Law’s public service placement programs, and talks about the strategies and efforts the school has in place to help student find public interest employment. Director Hansen also discusses the public service field as a whole, and encourages all students to take advantage of at least one public service opportunity, although she does warn that students should never consider a career in public service as a “back up” employment plan.

Elizabeth Dunn believes that what makes Villanova’s public interest scholarship program different is the full tuition waiver it offers to students who agree to work in public service for three of the first five years after graduation. She advises that students only take part in these types of scholarship programs if they are committed to public service and understand that they will be living on a lower income level than their law firm peers. In closing, Director Dunn suggests that students thoroughly research the scholarship programs available at the schools they are interested in because every program is different and it is important that the student take part in the program that is best suited to them and their future career aspirations.

Guests:

Heather Jarvis – Student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com
Beth Hansen – Director of Career Services at BYU Law School
Elizabeth Dunn – Director of Public Service Careers and Pro Bono programs at Villanova Law School.

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/public-interest-scholarship-programs-3/feed/ 0 0:11:37 This week's podcast takes a look at public interest scholarship programs. We'll hear from experts Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com; Beth Hansen, Director of Career Services at BYU Law School; and Elizabeth Du[...] This week's podcast takes a look at public interest scholarship programs. We'll hear from experts Heather Jarvis, student loan expert and owner of www.askheatherjarvis.com; Beth Hansen, Director of Career Services at BYU Law School; and Elizabeth Dunn, Director of Public Service Careers and Pro Bono programs at Villanova Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no
Estate and Trust Law https://lawschoolinteractive.com/estate-and-trust-law-3/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/estate-and-trust-law-3/#comments Mon, 09 Jul 2012 14:04:18 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1965 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the practice of estate and trust law. We’ll hear from experts Jeff Forer, attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP; Robert Mucklestone, attorney at Perkins Coie LLP; and Brian Starr, attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC.

Jeff Forer tells us the practice of estate and trust law focuses on the wills and estates of both living and deceased individuals. He emphasizes that understanding the concepts of income and estate taxes are extremely important for estate attorneys. Forer underscores the importance of doing externships, donating time to learn the practice, and reading materials within the specialty, and says that doing these things will increase your knowledge of and comfort within the field.

Robert Mucklestone explains that students interested in estate and trust law should be aware that there are not many people that fall within the range of a “true estate,” which means that a large client base will likely not be available. Mucklestone underscores the importance of understanding federal estate and gift taxes due to their importance in the field.

Brian Starr begins by saying that his “break” into the estate and trust law industry was a clerkship he did that taught him the ways of the law practice. He believes, as does Forer, that internships and volunteer opportunities are the best way for students to come into this law practice. Starr also explains the importance of building great relationships with your clients, stating that most wills and estates clients will only feel comfortable divulging sensitive financial information to someone they trust. In conclusion, he advises students to begin by working for free and becoming certain that this is the type of law they want to practice before getting too involved.

Guests:

Robert Mucklestone – Attorney at Perkins Coie LLP
Brian Starr – Attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC in Phoenix, Arizona
Jeff Forer – Attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/estate-and-trust-law-3/feed/ 0 0:23:34 This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of estate and trust law. We'll hear from experts Jeff Forer, attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP; Robert Mucklestone, attorney at Perkins Coie LLP; and Brian Starr, attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC.[...] This week's podcast takes a look at the practice of estate and trust law. We'll hear from experts Jeff Forer, attorney at Hinojosa & Wallet LLP; Robert Mucklestone, attorney at Perkins Coie LLP; and Brian Starr, attorney at Starr Law Firm, PLC. More... Law School Interactive no no
Large Versus Small Law Firms https://lawschoolinteractive.com/large-versus-small-law-firms-4/ https://lawschoolinteractive.com/large-versus-small-law-firms-4/#comments Mon, 02 Jul 2012 02:00:55 +0000 http://lawschoolinteractive.com/?p=1962 More...

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Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast takes a look at the differences between large and small law firms. We’ll hear from experts Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com, Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law, and Abby Armstrong, Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School.

Elie Mystal talks about how the size difference between small and large law firms most often affects how well you will know your coworkers. He also suggests that students don’t focus on the size of the firms when looking for legal jobs—rather, focus on the quality of the department in the specialization you are interested in. Mystal goes on to say that, when deciding on what law firm size to consider, students should remember that larger law firms are often more fast-paced and competitive, while small firms tend to foster a more paced, close-knit environment.

Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law, talks about some of the main differences between large and small law firms: The size of the support staff within the firm, the types of law that are practiced, and the tasks that younger associates are able and required to perform. She mentions that students who are interested in becoming familiar with a variety of different law specializations should strongly consider smaller firms. Dean Huebner advices law students to speak to lawyers practicing in both types of firms in order to get an “insider’s view” on what working at each is like.

Abby Armstrong, Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School, states that the main differences between the two sizes of law firms are the “entrance requirements.” She believes that large firms are looking for students at the top of their class, while smaller firms look at all types of students, and place importance on the level of involvement within the local community that a student possesses. In closing, Director Armstrong says that larger firms often offer a greater starting salary and an in-house mentor, whereas small firms will best suit a risk-taker and “hustler.”

Guests:

Elie Mystal – Editor of legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com
Vicki Huebner – Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law
Abby Armstrong – Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School

Free LSAT Help:

LSAT and Law School Admissions Discussion Board
LSAT and Law School Admissions Blog

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https://lawschoolinteractive.com/large-versus-small-law-firms-4/feed/ 0 0:21:54 This week's podcast takes a look at the differences between large and small law firms. We'll hear from experts Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com, Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University Sc[...] This week's podcast takes a look at the differences between large and small law firms. We'll hear from experts Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid AboveTheLaw.com, Vicki Huebner, Assistant Dean of Law Career Services at Santa Clara University School of Law, and Abby Armstrong, Director of the Office of Career Services at Vermont Law School. More... Law School Interactive no no