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Decoding the Meaning of Your LSAT Score

Podcast Highlight:

This week’s podcast discusses the meaning of your LSAT score. On the program we have Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review; Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions; and Elie Mystal, an editor at Above the Law, a legal tabloid.

A student’s LSAT score is one of the many attributes that law school admissions look at when accepting incoming 1L students. The score can be determining factor for admission to or rejection from a law program. Our guests today discuss how what an LSAT score means, and attempt to debunk the myth of the LSAT as an IQ test and a measure of overall intelligence.

Our first guest, Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs at Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, explains the history of the LSAT and discusses why potential law school students need to take the exam. Thomas also suggests that, more than anything, the LSAT is the start to your legal education and should be seen as that.

Andrew Brody, National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review, says that the LSAT score can mean a variety of things-but it all depends on the student. He also suggests that the score’s main purpose is to get students accepted into law school, although it is also used by schools to gauge how a student might do in law school.

Our final guest, Elie Mystal, an editor at legal tabloid Above the Law, discusses how excelling on the LSAT may show superb knowledge in one specific area of the test, but doesn’t indicate someone’s overall intelligence. Mystal believes, like Brody, that an the LSAT score really only determines where a student will be able to attend law school, and not much else.

Guests:

Andrew Brody – National Content Director for LSAT Programs at The Princeton Review
Jeff Thomas – Assistant Director of Pre-Law Programs for Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions
Elie Mystal – Editor at legal tabloid Above the Law

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